PAUL MUTH

Can the XFL thrive in Houston's crowded sports landscape?

Tommy Maddox won the XFL's first and only title. Now the league is planning a reboot with a team in Houston. Scott Halleran/Allsport

It began nearly a year ago with WWE founder and chairman Vince McMahon announcing the return of a gimmick-free XFL. It continued when rumors swirled as XFL executives toured Houston’s BBVA Compass stadium and TDECU Stadium back in September. It was then all but confirmed past weekend when news leaked that Houston will, in fact, be among one of the eight founding members of the revived league. A press conference from the XFL scheduled for Wednesday seems to be a formality as most expect that the time will be used to confirm what everyone already knows:

Houston is getting some (more) football.

So let’s do a quick tally. Houston already boasts franchises in MLB, NBA, NFL, MLS, and Minor League Baseball. On top of all of that, the Bayou City’s Sabercats finished their inaugural season of Major League Rugby just this past year. Collegiately, Houston is home to the Cougars, the Owls, and the TSU Tigers. And if you want to take a deep dive, Houston is the home of the Outlaws, one of the original Overwatch League teams. The bottom line is, Houston is already well represented in the sports world.

Can Houston support yet another sport, when options already swaddle sports fans year round? It’s possible, but not guaranteed.

Before we jump in, let’s backtrack just a step or two and add context. The XFL itself is a reboot of a failed attempt at a second football league that debuted back in 2001. The cheerleaders were flashy, the players could use nicknames on their jerseys, and - like the WWE from whence its founder made his fortune - it was all style and very little substance.

The new XFL returns with the promise of legitimacy. The league’s first move in that direction was the hiring of former Houston Oilers quarterback Oliver Luck as the league’s commissioner. This time around McMahon will not only be be financing the entire league out of his own pocket, he will also uniquely be in charge of every team in the league.

Early concepts of the XFL have suggested that pace of play will be increased, resulting in a faster game with a target duration of roughly 2 hours. And one of the smartest early moves has been the two year launch window they’ve set themselves, as they hope to be ready to play in the spring of 2020. This allows the league to vet cities properly, establish their business and execute with a strong foundation versus the one year roll out they attempted the first time.

All of this looks great from a business perspective, but in order for it to succeed, Houstonians are going to need to buy in. I believe that, as long as the price is right, and the schedule doesn’t conflict with any previously established seasons, that won’t be a problem at all.

With the news that XFL execs were scoping out venues like TDECU and BBVA, it’s not too far of a reach to assume that the new football league won’t be commanding a premium to come watch their product. For perspective, the cheapest seat available to watch the Texans stomp the Cleveland Browns this past weekend was $81, and that’s before parking. Both of the prospective XFL home stadiums are centrally located and accessible by Metrorail. If the price point matches that of a Dynamo game or a midweek Rockets contest, it’s not out of the realm of possibility to think that parents would be more willing to take the family to an XFL game at a cheaper price and in a more intimate setting over the investment that an NFL Sunday has become.

Another reason that the XFL should work in Houston is that it’s simply more football, and Houston LOVES football. As long as it’s marketed appropriately and remains self-aware that the Texans rule the roost, there’s no reason why a franchise can’t succeed here. Football fans typically begin complaining about the length of the offseason about 5 minutes after the Super Bowl concludes, and the XFL seems like a perfect remedy to the problem. Instead of competing head to head against the NFL, the XFL plans to play its 10-game season in the spring, affording fans the allure of almost year-round football. That’s a prospect that should at least bring viewers to the table.

Ultimately I believe that the XFL made a sound business decision in awarding Houston one of its inaugural franchises. The Dynamo and Sabercats have proven that Houston will root for you if the conditions are right. This is a football town, and as long at the XFL takes itself seriously this time, I expect an entertaining and successful relationship with Houston fans.

 

Every-Thing Sports

Texans vs Chiefs: Good, bad & ugly

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The Texans and Deshaun Watson won the battle of the two best quarterbacks from the 2017 draft over Pat Mahomes and the Chiefs 31-24. Here are my observations:

The Good

-Although both young quarterbacks had two turnovers each, it was Watson who outdueld Mahomes. He had a total of 322 yards and three touchdowns to Mahomes' 272 yards and three touchdowns. It was his ballsy playmaking ability on two fourth down conversions, as well as his timely rushing touchdowns in a big time road win that put him over.

-Rookie defensive lineman Charles Omenihu had a crucial strip sack of Mahomes just before halftime. Linebacker Benardrick McKinney recovered the fumble and the Texans scored on the next play to go up 23-17 with their 20th unanswered points of the first half. This was a huge momentum shifter.

-Tashaun Gipson caught the first Mahomes interception of the season in the second quarter. The Chiefs were driving again and in field goal range when Mahomes took a shot at the end zone thinking he had a free play because of a potential pass interference/defensive holding call. The refs remarkably overruled the original call and ruled it an interception. Shocker!

The Bad

-Whitney Mercilus jumped offsides and Mahomes took a deep shot knowing he had a free play. Tyreek Hill won the jumpball over Justin Reid and Phillip Gaines. Hill is listed at 5'10, but looked as if he was 6'7 when he leaped to catch the ball. Reid appeared to have the ball in his grasp, but came up empty.

-Carlos Hyde fumbled on the first play from scrtimmage where he appeared to have simply lost his grip on the ball. The no-contact fumble was recovered by the Chiefs and led to a field goal to put the score at 10-0 about five minutes into the game.

-Watson threw a pick into double coverage trying to go for DeAndre Hopkins in the end zone while thewy were in field goal range down 24-23. It was his second pick of the day. It also came after Hopkins dropped a potential touchdown catch uncharacteristically taking his eyes off the ball before securing the catch.

The Ugly

-Horrible missed call on an offensive pass interference on the Chiefs opening drive! Travis Kelce basically threw a pass block that opened up Damien Williams for a huge 52-yard gain. The Texans challenged the call and the refs upheld it. This was the epitome of ref C.Y.A.

-The two teams combined for 14 penalties for 114 yards in the first half. That was most in a half this season. In an offensive shootout, penalties can kill you. They ended the game with 21 combined penalties for 149 yards.

-Rookie offensive lineman Tytus Howard was carted off with a leg injury on the third play of the 3rd quarter. It looked to be somewhat serious as his leg was rolled on and bent in a weird way. Bradley Roby gingerly walked off the field mid way throught he 3rd quarter and left the Texans with four healthy corners. Few plays later, Chiefs went up 24-23 on another Hill touchdown catch.

The Texans put together a great gameplan and it went as well as one could expect against a juggernaut like the Chiefs. Bill O'Brien deserves come credit. He gambled on a couple key 4th down conversions because he trusted Watson to do the right thing. He also committed to the run to the tune of 192 yards on the ground, despite Hyde's early fumble. Hyde himself ended up with 116 yards rushing. If O'Brien and Watson keep this up, there could be big things on the horizon. Next week's matchup against the Colts in Indy will tell us who's the big dog in the AFC South. Can O'Brien and Watson make magic again?

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