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Clear Creek's Hildreth stars in 'Last Chance U'

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You may not know the name Chase Hildreth yet, but you will.

The Netflix show 'Last Chance U' launches its fourth season in mid-July and at the center of the controversial show is the former Clear Creek quarterback Hildreth.

Hildreth lit up scoreboards with his arm for the Wildcats throwing for over 5,800 yards and 75 touchdowns during his prep career.

The 6-foot-3 lefty has had a football journey. After high school, he played at Blinn CC then transferred to Scottsdale CC.

He got his shot this year to be the QB1 at Independence CC, the subject of 'Last Chance U' and the boisterous coach Jason Brown. The Patriots went 2-8 on the season and Hildreth played in six games, throwing for over 1,200 yards and seven touchdowns.

"My time at Indy had its ups and downs, but overall I felt like it was a great learning experience," he said. "The junior college life isn't for everybody. You have to really love the game in order to make it out."

He's now at Texas State, along with new coach Jake Spavital – considered an offensive genius.

Continue on Vype to see the trailer for the upcoming season of 'Last Chance U.'

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Originally Appeared on VYPE

KINGWOOD - The true impact of a coach can't always measured by the number of win and losses, the number of district championships or even runs at a state title.

This story goes beyond any of that.

In reality, the impact a coach is seen whenever they become the one that is in need of the support that they have been providing to others their entire career.

Kingwood girls soccer coach Pres Holcomb, who is set to begin chemotherapy to battle Stage 4 colon cancer, which he was diagnosed with on December 20, is seeing his impact as the Kingwood and soccer community has rallied around him and his family with messages, wristbands, t-shirts, donations and more.

"It's overwhelming in a good way," Holcomb said. "It's kind of crazy when you see your own name across stuff like that. Once we went public with it, the support has been amazing. People you haven't talked to in years are reaching out to you."

Since they've gone public with it the "Hope for Holcomb" campaign has taken off.

The soccer team - which was told about Holcomb's battle in a group setting - created blue wristbands with the phrase on them. It started with the girls wearing them during matches and expanded to them being sold at different places in the community.

They started by ordering just 300.

Then an order of 500 more was needed and that still wasn't enough. The wristbands have sold more than 1,000.

"You don't even think you know that many people," Holcomb said.

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