Remarkable Rebound

From cancer to Hawaii, Reed on national stage for Chaminade

Brett Reed making a name for himself at Chaminade in Hawaii. Vype

Originally appeared on Vype.com.

Crazy college basketball fans set their DVRs for the “One Shining Moment” segment minutes after the NCAA Tournament Final. 

You know what I’m talking about. The ups and downs, the great shots, the dunks, the celebrations and tears.

Brett Reed lived his “One Shining Moment” earlier this week in Hawaii, where he attends college at Chaminade University of Honolulu.

The Silverswords host the Maui Invitational, a famous college NCAA holiday tournament on ESPN — where Notre Dame, Cal, VCU, Michigan, LSU and Wichita State do battle. And the Silverswords got the chance to mix it up with the more well-known programs.

The 6-foot-8 College Park grad was right in the mix, locking down Player of the Year candidate Bonzie Colson of the Fighting Irish in front of a national television audience on ESPN.

“I came off the court and had tons of texts and Snapchats,” he laughs. “I was shocked to see how many people were watching. I’ve never been on national television before.”

“I hit a buzzer-beater and played great defense on one of the nation’s top players,” he said. “It was great playing against the best in the nation and I was really proud of how I did.”

Chaminade ended up beating Cal in their final game of the tournament and caught some national attention.

“This has been the greatest week of my basketball life,” he laughs. “We are hanging at the finest resorts and living the life out here. The tournament treated us like kings.”

So how does a kid from Houston’s north side end up in Hawaii? His amazing story begins in the Texas Children’s Cancer Ward.

Reed was a 6-foot-2 post in the College Park Cav program, hanging with buddies and playing pick up games at Legends Sports Complex, 24-Hour Fitness and Villa. During the summer before his junior season he hit the summer church camp circuit with some friends.

“I was at a church camp and just felt this lump behind my ear,” he said. “I thought I got bit by a spider or something. I got home and hit the courts, but it wouldn’t go away. I went to the doctor and just wanted some antibiotics. I was ready to get out of there. It still didn’t help."

“My mom just had this bad feeling like moms do, and brought me to our family friend, who was a doctor. He said something was not right. I checked into our local hospital for two weeks. Then they took a biopsy and they sent me to Texas Children's.”

There he received the news that he had Non-Hodkin's lymphoma in his neck and head.

“My mom was crying and I honestly didn’t know if I was going to live,” he said. “My family flew in and the College Park coaches came up to the hospital. Everyone was acting like I was going to die and I was freaking out."

“They told me I had a 60-percent chance of beating it, and at that moment I knew I was gonna be good. I know myself and knew I would beat it. It was a long 10 months with the chemotherapy and the affects.”

He did beat it and got back on the varsity court late in his junior year as the Cavs made a run deep into the regional tournament.

“I’ll never forget beating The Woodlands on a buzzer-beater and then in a double-OT in the second game,” he recalls. “Those were the best wins I’ve ever been a part of.”

Reed had a solid senior season, but was still looking for the right fit in college. He was asked to walk-on a few spots, but really wanted to go the junior college route and get re-recruited.

He had a couple of opportunities to walk-on at a few Division I schools, but decided to head West and enrolled at Cabrillo Community College under the direction of coach Tony Marcopulos.

“I really wanted to play immediately and it was the best decision I made,” he said. “I wanted to get out of the state of Texas and see something new. The coaches saw some video of me at an event, and emailed me. Before I knew it, I winded up in California. It was great because I literally played every position."

“I still talk with coach Marcopulos every week,” he said. “When I went there, he told me he would take care of me. After my parents, he’s my greatest mentor.”

Reed was a two-time California Community College Athletic Association first-teamer, a first-ever for Cabrillo. He signed with the University of San Francisco, but Marcopulos didn’t send in the paperwork because he felt a change coming. The day after, there was indeed a coaching change.

His second choice? He would soon call Chaminade University in Honolulu home and began receiving playing time earlier this month.

“I was a late add to their class and the coach was thinking about redshirting me to get some more development,” he said. “I was playing well and I told him, ‘let’s go.’ I was ready to play.”

With his size, competitive nature and versatility, Reed now sees his future beyond college.

“I also came here because they sent six guys to the professional ranks in Europe,” he said. “I know the NBA is a long shot, but trying to play overseas is becoming an option. My ultimate goal is the get paid for something I love to do.”

It’s a long way from that hospital room at Texas Children’s Hospital in downtown Houston. Now he plays the sport he loves in Hawaii with a bright future ahead of him.

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The Astros will look to bounce back after a tough week. Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images.

After a 6-3 record to start the season, the Houston Astros had a tumultuous week to say the least. They were swept by the Tigers, lost 2 of 3 games to the Seattle Mariners and placed five players on the COVID injured list.

The Tigers' new manager AJ Hinch returned to Minute Maid Park for the first time since the Astros let him go after the cheating scandal in early 2020.

The Tigers swept the Astros and outscored them 20-8 over their three matchups.

Before the 3rd game of the series, the Astros found out they would be without five players on their active roster. Jose Altuve, Alex Bregman, Yordan Alvarez, Martin Maldonado and Robel Garcia were all placed on the COVID-19 injury reserved list.

"It's hard on the team but you have to carry on. The show must go on," manager Dusty Baker said. "And it went on today with some younger players we have here."

Garrett Stubbs, Taylor Jones and Abraham Toro were called up as well as Alex De Goti and Ronnie Dawson who made their major league debuts last week.

The Tigers were able to score runs early on Zack Greinke, Lance McCullers and Jake Odorizzi (who made his Astros debut) and none of these starters lasted more than five innings in the outings.

Yuli Gurriel was the one Astros bright spot against the Tigers as he had 7 hits and drove in 2 runs. He is still continuing to hit the ball consistently as he finished the series with a .429 batting average.

After a 1-5 home stand the Astros looked to bounce back on the road against the division leading Seattle Mariners (you read that correctly).

Friday night proved to be the Astros' best offensive performance since their home opener on April 8th against the A's.

They scored five runs on Yusei Kikuchi through 7 innings behind good hitting from Aledmys Diaz, Chas McCormick and De Goti who drove in two runs on his first major league hit.

The Astros had a 5-2 lead at this point, but Seattle was able to score 4 unanswered to win the game.

Bryan Abreu, Blake Taylor and Ryne Stanek were credited with those four runs.

Ryan Pressly tried to clean up the bottom of the 9th inning after Stanek put the first two batters on base. His effort was unsuccessfully as Ty France hit a game-ending single that scored J.P. Crawford from second to secure a Mariners victory.

Saturday was the best game of the week for the Astros as they finally broke their six-game losing streak.

After failing to pitch more than five innings on Monday against the Tigers, Zack Greinke threw eight shutout innings with 91 pitches.

He struck out six batters and gave up only 4 hits.

"That's what aces do," Astros manager Dusty Baker said. "Guys like (Greinke) ... they stop the bleeding and we're about bled out."

Greinke finished the game with 2,705 career strikeouts. He is now third amongst active players in strikeouts behind Max Scherzer and Justin Verlander.

Ryan Pressly got some redemption too as he threw a perfect 9th inning giving him his first save of the year.

The Astros won this game 1-0 as Taylor Jones drove in the game's only run with an RBI single.

Sunday's game ended the Astros week with a whimper, as the Mariners bested Houston 7-2.

Jake Odorizzi got off to a good start, but he gave up three hits and was pulled after Mitch Haniger's fifth-inning triple made it a 3-2 lead over the Astros.

Odorizzi is now (0-2) with a 10.57 ERA after two starts with the Astros.

Houston's offensive woes continued Sunday, as Aledmys Díaz had their only hit, an RBI double in the second inning that fell in when outfielder José Marmolejos lost the ball in the sun.

"It's tough to take when you only got one hit and the one hit we got was lost in the sun," Baker said.

UP NEXT: The Astros (7-8) will finish their road trip with a two game series against the Rockies who have the worst record in the league (4-12) before starting an eight-game homestead.

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