Changes Are Coming

Growing Interest for Restricted Circle in High School Basketball

Officials say adding a restricted circle would make officiating the game easier (Photo by VYPE Media's Bradley Collier).

Originally Appeared on VYPE

SAN ANTONIO – While the current debate in high school basketball is whether or not to add a shot clock to add more excitement to the game, there is a growing interest for something else not in high school… the restricted circle.

If you are unfamiliar with it, the restricted circle is a semi-circle found in the paint near the hoop in men's and women's college and pro basketball. Added a few years ago, the restricted circle defines where a defender can draw a charge and where it cannot. If the defender's foot is touching or inside the circle, or any part of its body is on/inside the circle, the official cannot call a charge. It can only call a block on the defender, or not make a call at all.

This was put in years ago, so that defenders couldn't just stand under the hoop and take a late charge. It also was put in to make it easier for officials to decide what to call, especially in a late game scenario, or at least what not to call.

I spoke with several officials who have worked UIL basketball title games in the last couple years and each said it would be a good thing so that officials don't have to deal with a gray area. One official who worked a state title game on Saturday was in the stands watching the Wagner-Timberview 5A final. I had dinner with him and he said that game showed why the restricted circle would be a great addition.

"There were a couple of close block-charge calls," he said. "If the restricted circle were used in high school, it would have taken some of the gray area out and allowed the crew to better determine whether to call a block, a charge, or nothing."


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Via Vype

Originally Appeared on Vype

AUSTIN – Dalton Holland didn't know if he'd be able to get back to state in 2019.

At the beginning of the season, the Barbers Hill senior sprained his ankle badly, which forced him to be in a boot for two to three weeks and miss the first half of the track season.

"I had some doubts, I didn't think I'd be able to come back," Holland said.

Battling his way back through the therapy, Holland was able to qualify for state for a second-straight year and on Friday the senior left it all on the track.

Holland posted a time of 14.19 to claim the silver in the Class 5A 110-meter hurdles.

"Makes it a lot sweeter victory," Holland said about coming back to get the win.

In 2018, Holland came to state for the first time and ended up finishing fifth overall, fueling him to come back better this season.

"Last year I was pretty nervous coming in my first year," Holland said. "This year, I was more calm and under control. I knew what was coming."


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