Every-Thing Sports

What does Jermaine Every "nerd-out" over in sports?

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Merriam-Webster defines a nerd as an unstylish, unattractive, or socially inept person; especially one slavishly devoted to intellectual or academic pursuits. Society will oftentimes places this term on those they don't feel are worthy of mainstream popularity. When you Google the term "nerd-out," Urban Dictionary defines it as getting overly excited about something that isn't generally cool.

Society has traditionally made it uncool to be a nerd and nerd-out. People have been shunned for their quirks, idiosyncrasies, and generally being different. Lately however, society has made it more acceptable to come out of your shell and be yourself. In essence, it's more acceptable to nerd-out over your favorite things.

When it comes to sports, I've been known to nerd-out over lots of things. There's more than enough to fill up this article and a few more. But to save you guys the boredom, I've trimmed my list down to a few things:

Pro Wrestling

Yes. I love pro wrestling. I have since I was a kid and have no shame about it. I love the storytelling, the psychology, the athleticism, and the ability to be a soap opera. Sure, some may not want to list it in any sports category because the outcomes are predetermined, but I challenge anyone to go through a pro wrestling camp and/or travel schedule. It can be downright brutal. Your favorite athletes have taken to pro wrestling's promos, particularly Ric Flair's.

Football Positional Play

Most people ohh and ahh over a nice throw, a one-handed catch, someone getting trucked, or a huge hit. Those are all great, but I'd rather see a pulling guard pancake block somebody, or a punt downed inside the one yard line, or a good jam on a receiver, or a good route combo that allows a receiver to be wide open. Honorable mention goes to a guy shedding a block to shut down a screen pass. Thank God I have friends who know the game that don't mind my random texts about football.

Basketball Fundamentals

While most of you get excited when guys jack up threes, I take special interest in the way they're able to square their shoulders and feet with the perfect release and follow through. I used to love watching Dennis Rodman rebound. He would follow the ball from the shooters hand, judge the release and rotation on the ball, box out, and then come up with the rebound despite being undersized. He was also one of the best defenders who could easily defend any position on the floor and lock them down. Also, a flawlessly executed pick and roll or fastbreak will give me goosebumps.

Baseball Pitches

Confession: when the Astros were in the World Series against the Dodgers, I cheered when Clayton Kershaw would throw that nasty ass 12 to 6 curveball. Randy Johnson's slider and Greg Maddux's fastball were two of my all time favorites. The Big Unit's slider may be obvious. But Maddux's fastball? It's because he never threw one faster than about 92, but he could pinpoint where he wanted it whenever he wanted.

There are so many more that I'd like to get to, and so much more detail I'd like to go into on the ones listed. However, If I write 1,000 words or more, Fred and Josh will kick my ass. Hit me up on Twitter and we can further discuss my inner sports nerd. Special shot out to all my friends who put up with my randomness and even discuss this stuff with. You guys are the real MVPs.

Bregman's great year not enough to overtake the best in the sport

Mike Trout wins 2019 AL MVP over Alex Bregman

Photo by Harry How/Getty Images

After a close race, the MLB announced on Thursday that the winner of the American League Most Valuable Player Award is Los Angeles' Mike Trout. He edges out Alex Bregman, who many thought might be able to capitalize on missed time by Trout in 2019 to steal the award. Trout takes the award for the third time in his career, joining a list of only ten other players in history to win it three or more times.

Missed time not enough for Bregman to steal it

What some may have thought would put Bregman over Trout in the mind of voters is the sustained success he had in a complete season. Trout missed 28 games this season mostly due to injury, while Bregman played in 156 of the teams 162 games, sitting out just a handful of games with minor injuries or scheduled rest.

Still, Trout managed to put up incredible numbers that Bregman couldn't quite match. Trout led the entire league in WAR at 8.6 with Bregman right behind in 8.5. He also led the MLB in walk percentage (18.3%), on-base percentage (.438), and was second in OPS (1.083), which was best in the AL. Trout was second in the AL in home runs (45), sixth in runs (110), and ninth in RBIs (104) despite his missed time.

Still a terrific season for Bregman

Bregman finished with 41 home runs (3rd in the AL), 122 runs (4th), 112 RBIs (5th) while leading the entire league in walks (119) to put him third in walk percentage (17.2%). The walks helped boost his on-base percentage and OPS, finishing second to Trout in both categories in the AL at .423 and 1.015, respectively. Bregman did finish with a better batting average, posting a .296 to Trout's .291.

One of his most impressive stretches, though, came in his hot August, which earned him a player of the month honor. That month, he drove in 31 runs while hitting six home runs and fourteen doubles, working his way up to a 1.235 OPS over the 26 games he played.

2019 was by far Bregman's best performance in his early career and shows that the future is bright for the young third baseman who the Astros currently have tied up for the next five seasons. Though Mike Trout will likely still be the favorite for MVP for many years to come, Bregman showed this year that he could give him an honest fight for the award.

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