Falcon Points

This has to happen for the Texans to win a Super Bowl

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Yes, we will get to that. But today we look at a bigger point, one brought up by Aaron Rodgers.

In a recent interview, he had this to say about our click bait sports journalism world:

"Everybody's trying to say the most outlandish thing possible to get the most click bait. . . . My problem with putting ridiculous headlines on stories is that in this culture where the attention span is so short for many people, even people probably listening to this interview or watching this who can't stay on the entire time because they've got other things to do or other things to look at on their phone.

All they're going to read is eight words on an ESPN front page and . . . that's what these people are trying to get people to click on. One second on that page, that counts as a page view. And the more page views you get, the more ad revenue you get. And I think it's really low-class journalism. Some of the headlines that get put on some of these articles that have nothing to do with what's actually, contest-wise, in the article. I think it's poor journalism. I think it's a total lack of integrity. And I don't want to look at that.

And I don't want to listen to four people on some show, yelling at each other about opinions that, `Do they really feel that way? Or are they trying to be the most outlandish opinion possible so they get the most views when it gets retweeted on Twitter or posted as a 10-second blurb on ESPN.com or something. I just think it's really done a disservice to the industry of journalism, for sure."

He then added this:

"Look man, it comes down to this: If you're willing to sell out . . . and not have any character to stand on, then you kind of get what you deserve. If that's what it's all about with you, if your integrity is worth clicks or likes, then that says a lot about you."

He is absolutely right. Too much of journalism these days is misleading headlines designed to get you to click. We try to avoid that on SportsMap unless making a point, which is what you find with this article.

The other culprit is the people who don't bother to read the articles. I guarantee you someone will comment on Facebook about how ridiculous it is to say the Texans could win a Super Bowl. That person is proving Rodgers' point (and mine).

The reality is both the media and readers are at fault. Readers don't have time, so they read the headline and form an instant opinion. Media outlets know that, so they inflame headlines to get the clicks. Talking heads come up with hot takes so someone writes "so and so says this." They do it for attention. Headline takes are common on TV now, and there is big money in it. The best part is you don't have to think. You can just come up with an instant opinion.

So what do we do? Take time to read the articles. Don't fall for click bait. Yes, I did it to you, but I am also telling you why.

But since I don't want to contribute to the mess Rodgers refers to, yes, the Texans can win the Super Bowl if the key players stay healthy, Kansas City and Baltimore come back to the pack due to injuries or simple regression, and Deshaun Watson takes the next step. That all might be unlikely, but it's not impossible.

There, you have been paid off. You can thank Aaron Rodgers.

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