KHALEESI IN H-TOWN

5 things we learned about Game of Thrones stars Emilia Clarke and Nathalie Emmanuel at Comicpalooza

Nathalie Emmanuel, Houston Life host Courtney Zavala, and Emilia Clarke. DPWPR/Instagram

This article originally appeared on CultureMap and was written by Craig D. Lindsey.

As people were packing the George R. Brown Convention Center for Comicpalooza on a rainy Saturday, May 11, making sure their cosplay gear wasn't getting completely soaked, a huge but respectful crowd convened to the third floor General Assembly Hall to see Emilia Clarke and Nathalie Emmanuel, two of the revered, British stars from HBO's monster hit Game of Thrones.

Moderator Courtney Zavala, host of KPRC's daytime show Houston Life, didn't ask about the coffee cup from last week's ep); she instead focused on Emmanuel and Clarke and their revered characters — slave-turned-personal adviser Missandei (R.I.P.) and Daenerys Targaryen, the big, bad momma herself. At one point, they talked about Clarke's trademark eyebrows. Here's what we learned.

Ride or die girls
Clarke and Emmanuel are straight-up, ride-or-die, day-one chicks, discussing how they bonded when they shot in Morocco. When Emmanuel recalled a time when a revealing outfit she wore got unwarranted attention from some disrespectful gents, Clarke showed why she's the Mother of Dragons and told them to knock it off.

Humble starts
They also discussed how getting their now-iconic parts took them out of their mundane, day-to-day jobs and changed their lives immensely. Emmanuel was working in retail ("I had a mortgage," she divulged) while Clarke had a museum job that was apparently so strict, when she got the role of Targaryen, she had to stand on a toilet in a bathroom stall (or "the loo," as she adorably called it) so superiors wouldn't she see was in there changing her damn life.

Continue reading on CultureMap to learn about Emilia Clarke's thoughts on Beyonce.

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Jovan Abernathy is an international marathoner and blogger. Check out her new blog, HTown Run Tourist. Follow her on Twitter @jovanabernathy. Instagram @HTownRunTourist. Facebook @jovanabernathy. Join her facebook group: H-Town Run Tourist

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