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The Bobby Wolfe story—2019 Aggie commit

Bobby Wolfe, Texas A&M University commit. Vype

Originally appeared on Vype.com

If you had the pleasure of watching Bobby Wolfe play, it wouldn’t take long to see that Wolfe has a talent worth recruiting.

Since his sophomore year at Madison High School, Wolfe has been a highly recruited cornerback from all over the country.

To understand what makes Wolfe great on the field, you would have to understand where he comes from.

NEWBORN, NEW GRIND

Wolfe grew up in a gang environment watching his uncles sell drugs and he also had to live in a two-bedroom apartment with 10-plus relatives. Though he didn’t grow up in the best of circumstances the hard times shaped his dawg mentality on the field.

“Watching my mom struggle is what gave me the chip on my shoulder,” Wolfe said. “That’s why I don’t give up on plays.”

Just a year ago, Wolfe was blessed with some more motivation when he had a newborn son come into the world.

Wolfe said he thought he was really putting in work before, but once he had his son, he took his grind to a new level.

“I don’t think I’d be as good as I am now had I not had my son,” Wolfe said with a big smile.

GOD’S PLAN

Now that Wolfe is officially committed to Texas A&M University, he plans to continue his journey of working towards the NFL so that he can provide a better lifestyle for his family and son.

Wolfe said if it’s not in God’s plan for him to make it to the NFL he plans to become a brain surgeon.

A cousin of his who’s a brain surgeon always shares “inspiring stories” with Wolfe and that’s what struck his interest in brain surgery.

Make no mistake about it though, god willing, Wolfe has every intention on making it to the NFL.

Wolfe’s love for football runs so deep that he back peddles to his kitchen every morning as if he were defending a receiver on the field.

“Football is my life, it’s all I know,” Wolfe said. “If I didn’t have football I don’t know where I’d be. I would probably be dead or in jail locked up somewhere. Football is everything.”

THE COME UP

Wolfe has been playing football since the age of 4 and though he’s been playing nearly his whole life, it took time before he was the beast he’s developed into today.

When he first arrived at Madison, Wolfe wanted to be a quarterback, but over time he realized that wasn’t the best position for him.

He jumped to cornerback his sophomore year and initially he had trouble with simultaneously keeping up with the receiver and keeping eyes on the quarterback.

It took time to get comfortable at the position but once he did, Wolfe had one of his best games in his sophomore year.

“We had a game versus Fort Bend Bush,” Wolfe said. “We got into it with them before the game and the receiver was talking all the mess and I told him ‘I got something for him.’ When the game started I caught two picks off him and they never threw the ball back to him.”

After that game for Wolfe, the rest was history.

MORE ON BOBBY WOLFE

Where did you grow up?

Wolfe: Hiram Clarke. We call it “The Clarke”

What artist do you like to listen to?

Wolfe: Young boy.

What’s your favorite kicks?

Wolfe: Nikes.

What’s your favorite quote and/or bible verse?

Wolfe: Psalms 23:4 “Even though I walk through the valley of darkness, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.”

What tattoo has the most meaning to you?

Wolfe: The bull. (left bicep) When I turn into the bull, it’s over!

Any particular family member and/or coach that’s helped you through all you’ve been through?

Wolfe: Coach Cise and My 7-on-7 coach, Coach James. That man helped me a lot I came to him when I had no offers, no stars, no nothing. He’s never asked me for nothing. He’s always showed me genuine love.

What’s something people wouldn’t expect from you?

Wolfe: I like to play and laugh. I’m kind of goofy even though people think I’m so serious all the time.

What athlete do you look up to?

Wolfe: Deion Sanders

What’s your pregame song?

Wolfe: I like to listen to Eric Thomas before games. He gets me in the mode.

Why is your nickname Hollywood?

Wolfe: Because my life is like a movie sometimes.

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Boston's two grand slams in the first two innings were too much for Houston to overcome in ALCS Game 2. Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

After a win in ALCS Game 1 that had the prototypical fingerprints of this Astros team all over it, Houston returned to Minute Maid Park on Saturday, hoping to take a dominant 2-0 series lead if they could grab another victory. The Red Sox dashed those hopes very early, though, scoring eight runs across the first two innings to build the lead they would hold on to even the series.

Final Score: Boston 9, Astros 5

ALCS Series (Best of Seven): tied 1-1

Winning Pitcher: Nathan Eovaldi

Losing Pitcher: Luis Garcia

Houston met with disaster to start Game 2

You couldn't have drawn up a much better start for the Red Sox or a worse one for the Astros in Saturday's ALCS Game 2. Luis Garcia met early disaster in the top of the first inning, allowing a leadoff double, then got two outs while issuing two walks to load the bases. That brought up Boston's designated hitter, J.D. Martinez, to the plate, and he delivered a crushing blow to Houston, launching a grand slam to put the Red Sox up 4-0 before Houston could even get to the plate.

After a scoreless bottom of the inning by his offense, things got worse for Garcia in the top of the second, as after issuing a four-pitch walk to start the frame, he would become the center of a meeting at the mound with trainers, ultimately leaving the game with an injury. Houston opted to bring in Jake Odorizzi for the emergency call to the bullpen, but things did not start well for him either. He would put two of his own batters on base with two singles, then gave up the second grand slam in as many innings, this one to Rafael Devers to double Boston's lead to 8-0, doubling down on Houston's disastrous start to the game.

Odorizzi rebounded with a 1-2-3 third, but with one out in the top of the fourth allowed a solo homer to Kiké Hernández, his third homer of the series so far. He would still get the job done of eating up a few innings, finishing the fourth, and retiring Boston in order in the fifth, giving Houston just four more innings to cover with the rest of their relievers.

Astros get a few runs back

Over that span, Houston did trim the lead by three runs, getting an RBI double by Kyle Tucker and a two-RBI single by Yuli Gurriel in the bottom of the fourth, making it a six-run game at 9-3. Their next reliever was Blake Taylor in the top of the sixth, and he would keep the score where it stood by sitting down the three batters he faced that frame.

The Astros threatened again in the bottom of the sixth, getting two singles to put two aboard, but would come out empty, sending the game on to the seventh, where Taylor would remain on the mound. He faced three more batters, getting two out while allowing a single before Yimi Garcia would come in to get the third out.

Red Sox even the series as it shifts to Boston

Garcia returned in the top of the eighth, getting through that inning despite a walk and hit by pitch, stranding both runners. Boston's bullpen kept Houston from getting any closer in the bottom of the eighth, then Ryne Stanek came in for the Astros in the top of the ninth. Stanek allowed a leadoff double, but with a groundout and double play, held the score at 9-3. Yuli Gurriel and Jason Castro did their part to keep the Astros alive in the bottom of the ninth, each hitting solo homers to make it 9-5, but that's as close as they'd come, dropping Game 2 to tie the series at one game apiece.

Up Next: The ALCS now moves to Boston for the next three games after a day off on Sunday, with Game 3 on Monday at 7:08 PM Central. While the Astros have named Jose Urquidy as their starter, the Red Sox have not yet determined theirs.

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