COWBOYS 37, EAGLES 10

Cowboys vs. Eagles: Good, bad and ugly

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

After three straight losses, the Dallas Cowboys were in must win mode and needed to put up a good fight against the Philadelphia Eagles. On this day the Cowboys came through and absolutely dominated the Eagles from start to finish. The final score was 37-10 and was the largest margin of victory the Cowboys have had over the Eagles since 1998. With this win, the Dallas Cowboys now sit alone a top of the NFC East.

The Good

The good from Sunday night's game for the Cowboys was their ability to get off to a fast start. Slow starts were becoming the norm for the Cowboys after three straight losses, so it was a sight for sore eyes to see the Cowboys get two turnovers early in the first quarter. Dak Prescott finally looked like the Dak of the first three weeks of the season. He went 21-27 and threw a touchdown, and had one rushing touchdown in the 4th quarter. He did have one interception, but played with more confidence and composure than he did in the previous three weeks.

The Bad

The Dallas Cowboys are one of the most penalized teams in the NFL. According to The Football Database, the Cowboys rank seventh in the NFL in penalties and yesterday was no exception. Sunday's game saw six penalties for 65 yards. The Cowboys absolutely need to clean up this area of their game.

The Ugly

Injuries are becoming a concern. Tyron Smith obviously is still injured, and maybe needs another week off to fully recover. Luckily, the Cowboys are going to enter their bye-week and that should give him time to recuperate. The O-Line is a completely different unit when he is on the field, and he gives Prescott that extra line of security to give him more time in the pocket. In addition to Smith, Robert Quinn, Leighton Vender Esch and Jeff Heath all left Sunday's game with injuries. If key players keep getting hurt, it could have negative long-term ramifications for the rest of the season.

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Accountability seems to be lacking. Photo by Tim Warner/Getty Images

Did you catch exiled Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow, starting his "Redemption Tour 2020," doing his best imitation of Sgt. Schultz from the classic sitcom Hogan's Heroes?

"I see nothing. I hear nothing."

Luhnow sat for 37 minutes (the extended director's cut on click2houston.com) with Channel 2 sports reporter Vanessa Richardson and insisted that he played no part in the Astros 2017-18 illegal sign-stealing operation, and didn't deserve to be suspended for one year by baseball, and ultimately fired by Astros owner Jim Crane.

"I didn't know."

"I wasn't aware."

"I wasn't involved."

"Had I known about it, I would have stopped it."

"I was punished for something I didn't do."

Remember, Luhnow wasn't just the Astros general manager, he also held the title of President of Baseball Operations, responsible for every action that took place at Minute Maid Park, on the field, in the dugout, clubhouse, bullpen and boardroom.

Everybody else seemed to know, including field manager A.J. Hinch, who admitted that he knew the Astros were cheating, tried to stop it, but couldn't.

That's some leadership that Astros had in 2017-18. A manager who couldn't get his players to stop cheating, and a general manager who claims he didn't know. The inmates truly were running the asylum.

If Luhnow is telling the truth, that makes him one monkey who saw no evil, heard no evil and spoke no evil.

On one hand, Luhnow takes credit for building a supremely gifted Astros team that has made four consecutive American League Championship Series, won two American League pennants, and captured Houston's first World Series title in 2017.

One commercial break later, he's swearing that he didn't have a clue that his team was committing baseball's crime of the century – which ultimately cost the Astros their manager, general manager, a $5 million fine, and four draft picks.

Which is it, was Luhnow a detached genius, incredibly naïve or unfortunate scapegoat?

Luhnow claimed that an honest investigation by MLB would have determined that he was merely an innocent bystander to the scandal. He told baseball commissioner Rob Manfred that he was willing to take a lie detector test to prove it, but Manfred declined his offer.

OK, Manfred said a lie detector test wasn't necessary. Why didn't Luhnow do it anyway? It might have helped mitigate some of his sentence.

Put it this way, I work at Gow Media World Headquarters in Houston. If the boss brought me into his office and said he was firing me because I was stealing equipment, or missing deadlines or harassing other employees … and I was innocent, I holler to the high heavens that I was fired unjustly. I'd hire Jim Adler, the Tough Texas Lawyer, to sue everybody who ever touched a baseball for wrongful termination, defamation of character and a hundred other things. I wouldn't take a called third strike and wait 10 months to speak up.

Right now, Luhnow's once-brilliant reputation is sullied. He's on the outside of baseball looking in. Luhnow's protestation of innocence reminds me of Jose Canseco's book, Juiced, in 2005, where the slugger claimed that steroid use was rampant in the big leagues. And he named names.

Accused players bleated that they were innocent, that Canseco was a bad apple who made up stories to cover his own use of banned drugs.

Here's when I knew that Canseco, while a rat, was right – when the accused steroid users screamed bloody murder, but didn't sue Canseco. If somebody accused you of a crime that you didn't commit, a crime that cost you your job and legacy, a crime that might keep you out of the Hall of Fame of your profession, would you stay silent for almost a year and take the punishment lying down?

We may never know if Luhnow knew or didn't know that his Astros were cheating. It's possible that he's telling the truth now. His teary-eyed interview was convincing in parts. But accepting punishment for something you didn't do, and not fighting back – it's not a good look.

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