3 foods you thought were healthy, but could be detrimental to your health

Don't let the health market fool you

Be careful when consuming products you have known most of your whole life to be "healthy", just because of the way they are marketed. Yogurt, wheat bread, and cereal bars, are just a few of the foods that are marketed in America as "health" foods. However, there are some ingredients used in these foods, of which it is banned in China Australia, European Union, Canada due to health concerns. A few examples are potassium bromate (breads), bromated vegetable oil (some sodas), dairy with rGBH (milk/dairy product), and artificial dyes (Kraft,Mars brands) just to name a few. And finally our FDA is considering banning some of these foods here in the U.S. Here are 3 foods that we should take into consideration of our intake.

Yogurt:

The quick yogurt snack, Go Gurt, is marketed towards kids as a healthy snack, however it contains twice as much sugar than a bowl of lucky charms. Yogurts should not have added sugars, for 6 oz. it should have about 13 g of naturally occurring sugar from milk. On the safe side, try to stay under 20 g. for 6 oz. and be sure to stay away of yogurt containing high fructose corn syrup. Also there are yogurts that claim to have probiotic benefits, however when yogurt is pasteurized, most of the "good bacteria" are killed off. Wheat Bread:

The stereotype that wheat bread is healthier than white bread is being closely looked at. Most wheat breads contain high fructose corn syrup. Doctors have said high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has been linked to the leading cause of obesity in U.S. HFCS is 20x sweeter than regular sugar. It is a chemical that our brain does not recognize. HFCS disrupts the leptin production, which is the "I'm full hormone". Essentially HFCS leaves your brain thinking you need to eat more than you should be. Doctors have said it can be about 8x times more addictive than heroin or cocaine. HFCS is considered a foreign substance to our bodies, and when there is a foreign substance, our bodies store it, and therefore adds it to the waistline. Similar to the way our ancestors hunted and gathered their food. Their bodies would store food, since there was such a long period of time between meals and they wouldn't know when it was going to be either.

Cereal bars:

Cereal bars are marketed similarly to yogurt. Mostly marketed to kids and even to health nuts, such as Kellogg's and Fiber One. In most cereal bars the number 1 ingredient is sugar, as well as corn syrup. Kellogg's special K marketed as premiere healthy bars, with some being under 100 calories, yet contain tons of sugar. Fiber One contains corn syrup and sugars. Similar to cereal bars, regular cereal contains a number of dyes. Dyes may look pretty, but they are made from chemicals derived from petroleum. Petroleum is also used to make diesel, tar, and gasoline and is banned in most other countries.

When considering banning some of these foods out of your diet, be sure to take a good look at "Olean". Olean, which was previously called Olestra, which is a man made carbohydrate and is banned in Canada, China and European Union. Olean is one of the worst carbs you can eat, worse than gluten. You will often see it appear in fat free foods in potato chips, cookies, etc. Chips Ahoy, Pringles, Ruffles, Doritos, just to name a few brands within their "fat free" or "light" versions of the chips and cookies. It is an addictive carb and blocks the body from absorbing essential vitamins. Unless you go on an all organic diet and eat super clean, it is hard to live in America in 2019 with out running into some of these banned ingredients. In America sugar and sweeteners have increased 20 times in the last 50 years. Sugar is always added to foods you would never expect. There are also plenty of preservatives and chemicals that clog your digestive system and get turned into fat. It's time the FDA needs to crack down on more of these ingredients, in which these multi billion dollar companies are feeding us, just to cut cost. By skipping out on some of these ingredients you can clear up your skin, gain great amounts of energy, and make your bathroom habits regular.

You don't need diet tips, you just need a lifestyle change.

The Fitter Side of Golf

Speedgolf: The new revolution to traditional golf

Author's Own

Jovan Abernathy is an international marathoner and owner of Houston Tourism Gym. To claim your free tour, contact her at info@tourismgymhtx.com. Follow her on Twitter @jovanabernathy. Instagram @TourismGymHtx. Facebook @TourismGymHtx

So remember my first SportsMap article? Where I said that I met a pro golfer when I ran the Honolulu marathon? He was such a cutie. Of course, when I came back to Houston, I had to try my hand at golf. I was always intrigued by the sport. I had to give it a try.

I would go to Memorial Park and go to the range and whack some balls, but I could never get into it. There were three main reasons why.

It took too much time. I once clocked myself. It took 7 hours from start to finish to drive to the course, warmup, do a whole 18 holes, and of course have post food and drinks, and then drive back home.

It cost too much. I did some calculations. After everything, that's the green fees, cart rentals, buying and maintaining clubs, the bag, the balls, the glove, the shoes, stylinsh apparel, and of course lessons, and whatever else. It came out to $15,000 for a year.


David Harding from Oregon taking a swingAuthor's own


And it was kind of, well boring. You had to wait so long to get your turn. That was at least 4 of the 7 hours. I would get so antsy from standing still that long. Instead of relieving stress, it was causing stress. Instead of looking like Tiger Woods, I looked more like Charles Barkey.

At that time, I was running so many races that required a lot of time to train and lots of money. By the way, running allowed me to let my mind go because I was in constant movement. Then, I heard about this new thing (well new to me) called speedgolf. It seemed like the answer to my golf problems. Let me tell you about it.

Speedgolf is the funner, faster, and more fitness oriented format of the traditional game of golf. It was believed to be started in the 1970's in California when Steve Scott ran 18 holes in 29 minutes and 33 seconds holding only a 3-iron and finishing with 99 strokes. Basically, it is golf and running mixed. There's no golf cart. You are jogging to each hole as fast as you can. You carry one club or 4 clubs in a light weight golf bag.

I have to admit that I only have played one game of Speed golf. In that one game , I had more enjoyment that regular golf and it was really exciting. It took less time. I'm not even the fastest runner, but I finished 18 holes in half the time as a regular round of golf . Better than that....I burned 800 calories while I did it. The next day, I ran my regular route and I finished the 3-mile Memorial loop in 26 minutes instead of 29:30:00, so I got over 3 minutes faster.

The thing that really sold me is the imagination that Speedgolf sparks. The picturesque green is really inspiring. I hate getting up early to play, but I love seeing the dew dripping from the moss that is hanging from the trees. You can see the previous runners footprints in the dewy, manicured grass. I imagined myself at MacAllen Scotch Distillery in Ireland. See what I mean.

So, how do you play? So, basically, your score is comprised of your running time added with your number of strokes. So, if you had a count of 80 strokes and a running time of 60:00:00, you would then add them together. The strokes + time = Speedgolf score. So, 80 + 60:00:00 is 140. The lowest score wins. I highly recommend it. Be ready to get up early. Most golf courses want Speedgolfers to go first because they are faster than everybody else.

If you are a golfer looking to jazz it up, try Speedgolf. If you are a runner trying to mix it up, try Speedgolf. If you are looking for a cool sport to get into and you like taking pictures, get into Speedgolf. And if you want to save money, try Speedgolf. See you on the Green at the finish line!

To learn more about Speedgolf, visit SpeedGolfUSA or listen to Scott Dawley, founder of Speedgolf USA, on his podcast Pace of Change which can be downloaded from iTunes.

SportsMap Emails
Are Awesome