DONE WITH THE DOME?

It's back to square one for abandoned Astrodome money pit

Photo courtesy of City of Houston.

This article originally appeared on CultureMap.

The other day, I drove past the Astrodome, expecting to see workers scurrying, getting the once "Eighth Wonder of the World" back on its feet, back in business. Wasn't the plan to raise the floor to ground level and build a parking garage with 1,400 spaces below?

Didn't the county commissioners approve $105 million for Phase 1 of returning the Astrodome to a useful, money-making building? Wasn't the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo onboard with the project?

The ghost Dome

However, current Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo and Commissioners Court have brought everything to a screeching stop at the Astrodome. It's a ghost building again. Speaking on Houston Public Media, Hidalgo questioned if the $105 million plan "is fiscally responsible, that it will actually, with the funds committed to it, that it will actually get us to a point where the Astrodome is self-sustaining. What I'm discovering is that the 105 (million dollars) that was allocated is not enough to air condition the building. Is the current design enough for folks to actually want to rent it out?"Hidalgo is unclear about what to do with the Dome, and it's simply not a priority with her. She says she is concentrating more on issues like flood prevention and criminal justice reform. And certainly there is work to be done there.

Hidalgo's communications director, Kiran Khalid, put it more bluntly in Houstonia magazine, "This is really on the back burner for us at this juncture. Speculating on what will happen with the Astrodome, and when, is not at the top of mind for us."

Back to Square One

And with that, we are back to Square One on what to do with the Astrodome, with nothing being done and nobody, well, mostly nobody happy. This was after a decade of emotional, countywide wrangling what to do with the aging, forlorn and forgotten domed stadium — including suggestions like turning it into a convention and hotel center, and some rather out there ideas, like an indoor ski jumping attraction or movie studio.

I remember writing a column: My position was either do something with the Astrodome — or tear it down. Leaving it to rot was not acceptable. My dream solution would be to turn into a magnificent hotel and casino. Harris County and Houston would sit back and watch the money roll in, enough to fix every problem and pot hole five times over. But casino gambling is illegal in Texas. (That's so dumb and backward.)

The Dome deserves better

Built in 1965, the gleaming Astrodome, the world's first covered sports stadium, was Houston's logo and greatest accomplishment — until we put a man on the moon. Over the years, primary tenants like the Houston Oilers fled to Tennessee and the Houston Astros built a new home, Minute Maid Park. And we built a new football stadium and home for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo right next door to the Astrodome.

The new stadium, with every bell and whistle imaginable, only made the Astrodome look puny and old, an embarrassing, dingy public eyesore. In 2009, the Houston Fire Marshal declared the Astrodome unsafe for occupancy. He might as well slapped a "condemned" sign on the building.

In 2013, there was a vote whether to spend $217 million of public money to renovate the Astrodome, if not to its past glory, at least to modern usefulness. Many mistakenly considered the election a referendum on the Astrodome itself. Yes to fix it up, no to tear it down.

Ed to the rescue

The public spoke a resounding no, 53 to 47 percent. But Harris County Judge Ed Emmett was not willing to take no for an answer. Practically tying himself to the Dome as a human shield against the wrecking ball, Emmett was determined not to see the Dome demo'd on his watch.

Emmett insisted that his determination to keep the Dome standing was based on fiscal responsibility, not nostalgia or fear of being tagged "The man who lost the Dome."

Continue on CultureMap to find out if the Dome could be demolished.

Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

This article originally appeared on CultureMap.

Having finished with the best record in baseball, the Astros are the odds-on favorite to win the World Series. As 2017's run to the team's first title demonstrated, Houstonians go baseball crazy when the 'Stros are in the playoffs.

Frankly, watching sports is more fun in a group. Sweating out every pitch and cheering every home run is just better when surrounded by people who are locked in on every moment.

With that in mind, consider this list of recently opened or significantly renovated options for watching sports (roughly in the last year or so). While the focus is on the Astros, they'll also be handy should the Texans get things figured out or if the Rockets' union of James Harden and Russell Westbrook proves to be as dominant as it has the potential to be.

Electric FeelGood

Yes, the neon signage and slide might lead some to believe Midtown's newest bar is just a party spot, but it's got legit sports bar amenities, including lots of TVs downstairs and a room upstairs with a panel that can display eight different games at once. During Astros games, the bar's specials include beer buckets ($15 for domestics and $20 for imports) and discounts on snacks ($6 potato bombs and $10 flatbreads).

The Dogwood, Electric FeelGood's sister concept, isn't new, but it has specials of its own, including $14 buckets of Miller Lite or Coors Light, $5 pours of Jim Beam, $5 bowls of queso, $6 pulled pork sandwiches, and a dozen wings for $12.

Jack & Ginger’s

The Irish pub will have its TVs tuned in to the 'Stros throughout the playoffs. In addition to its typical happy hour deals on wine, appetizers, and beer flights (Monday through Friday 11 am to 9 pm), the bar will run game day specials of $5 Karbach Crawford Bocks and $5 Irish chips and dip (potato chips with smoked cheddar and French onion dip).

Pitch 25

Sure, this EaDo spot has a soccer theme, but the massive beer garden works for watching more than the beautiful game. They'll open early for Friday's 1 pm start. With 100 taps of beer and wine, finding the perfect pairing for that smoked turkey sandwich is a cinch.

Continue on CultureMap to see three more great spots to watch the Astros.

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