Blood is thicker than Water

Playing for his Brother

Josh watched his younger brother Jordan take over the game in his place Vype

Originally appeared on Vype

 

Josh Williams wasn’t going to get to play for a third SPC Football State Championship.

Williams, who was Kinkaid’s leading rusher throughout the season – 1,238 yards and 16 touchdowns rushing – had to stand on the sideline and watch due to an injury.

What he watched was his younger brother – Jordan – a 15-year-old freshman take over the game in his place.

In Kinaid’s 41-21 victory, for the program’s second-straight SPC 4A State Championship, Jordan’s stat line was video-game worthy – 202 yards rushing, one touchdown, 63 yards receiving and a touchdown, 33 yards passing and a touchdown and one interception.

“Coming into this game I just had him in my mind this whole game,” Jordan said about playing for his brother. “I was just trying do whatever I had to do to win. On defense I was trying to come up with hits. I know I have basketball season coming up but I was just like ‘I need to win for my brother’. On offense, I just saw a hole and I hit it.”

When added up, Jordan racked up 298 yards of offense and three touchdowns – one passing, rushing and receiving – and the defensive play for the interception.

“That’s special,” Kinkaid coach Nathan Larned said. “We knew he was a special player that’s why he’s been starting at free safety from day one.”

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Carlos Beltran missed out on his first opportunity to be inducted in the Hall of Fame this week, and we discuss how his involvement in the 2017 sign-stealing scandal may have played a role.

Plus, are we seeing a turning of the tide with national baseball writers and their opinion of the Houston Astros?

Bob Nightengale wrote this about Carlos Beltran and the Hall of Fame recently:

But we’re really going to ignore all of that and admonish him for participating in the Astros’ sign-stealing scandal.
Really?
Are we going to do the same with everyone who played for the Red Sox and Yankees during those years, too, when they were fined and disciplined for the illegal use of Apple Watches and dugout phones to relay signs?
Should we hold that against future Hall of Famer Justin Verlander, who obviously didn’t benefit from the sign stealing as a pitcher, but didn’t tell his teammates to stop it?
Enough already.
We’re not talking about performance-enhancing drugs here. Sign stealing has been going on for the past 100 years. There are teams who have used hidden cameras for years. Team employees flashed signs from outfield seats and scoreboards.

Check out the video above as we break it all down.

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