NASCAR heads for Martinsville for the first short track race of 2019.

NASCAR STP 400 preview

Kylebusch.com

This Sunday, the NASCAR Monster Energy Cup Series heads for the track they call the "paperclip" in Martinsville Virginia for their annual STP 500. Overall, the track is 0.526 miles around with twelve degrees of banking in all four of its corners. It is easily the shortest and most narrow track on the circuit, this will make it extremely difficult for drivers to pass without moving someone out of the way. Not only is the racing unique on the track but off it as well as the winner is awarded with a grandfather clock as their trophy. Look for there to be lots of action all around the track.

Last week, Kyle Busch dominated the Auto Club 400 and went on to capture his 53rd NASCAR Cup series victory. There was much controversy about this victory as it was his 200th victory across all three of NASCAR's divisions. As many fans know, the only other driver to reach 200 wins was the king, Richard Petty. Unlike Kyle Busch, Richard obtained all of his victories in the Cup series leading most to believe that his body of work was superior to Busch's body of work.

While yes, what Richard Petty did was unprecedented and will never be replicated but there are multiple factors to take into account. One is the competition Petty faced. For instance, in Petty's masterful 27 win season in 1967 many of his fiercest competitors like David Pearson did not run the full 49-race schedule, as opposed to Kyle Busch and how he faces the same field we see every week. That year, Pearson ran only 22 races while Petty ran all but one.

Another factor is the money that Petty and his team had back then as opposed to everyone else. Back before there were major sponsors like we see today, many drivers had to provide the money to race for themselves and Petty and his team were one of the first drivers to gain a major sponsor in STP. For drivers like Wendell Scott and Elmo Langley, they didn't have the same opportunities and resources they did at Petty Enterprises so it was hard for those type of drivers to keep up. Overall, if you ask anyone that followed the sport back then I think they would tell you that both Wendell Scott and Elmo Langley were just as talented as Petty but just didn't have the equipment he did.

This is where it differs with Kyle Busch, as most know in today's NASCAR these cars are much more closer than they were back then. At the end of the day while these cars may not be as difficult to drive as they were back in 1967, there is still a massive amount of skill that goes into driving now and when it is all said and done there is just no comparison between what both drivers have accomplished. When it is all said and done as fans we should accept the greatness that both Richard Petty and Kyle Busch have accomplished in their careers.

One of the drivers that you should look out for this week again is Martin Truex Jr. I am staying on this bandwagon like last week because I truly believe that he is due for a victory. Surprisingly, over the course of his 16-year career Truex has yet to win at a short track like Martinsville or Bristol. He has been close so many times like last year in the second race here in October when he was rooted out of the way by Joey Logano on the final lap who went on to win the race. This week, I think that he breaks out and finally gets that elusive grandfather clock and wins it come sunday.

(All stats and information used in this article is brought to you by the good folks at driveraverages.com and Racing-Reference.com the best website for all NASCAR stats).

What Makes Joe Gibbs One of the Greatest Sports Figures of All-Time

Discover What Makes Joe Gibbs Such a Great Leader...

NASCAR.COM

Sunday's Nascar Championship at Homestead-Miami Speedway was an emotional victory for the entire JGR team. Kyle Busch won his second championship with a five-second lead over his teammate and runner up, Martin Truex, Jr., who, like his teammate Denny Hamlin, had pit issues that cost them the race. It was a significant championship for the entire organization, as J.D. Gibbs, JGR's president, passed away in January of this year.

Tim Yeager and I caught up with former 13 year NFL veteran, Renaldo Wynn, who played for Coach Gibbs at the Redskins and who worked for Joe Gibbs Racing the past 8 years. When asked what sets Coach Gibbs apart as a leader, Renaldo replied that it has everything to do with Gibbs speaking vision into his leaders. Watch this clip to hear Renaldo describe Gibbs' leadership style.


Roger Patterson is a pastor and the author of A Minute of Vision for Men: 365 Motivational Moments to Kick-Start Your Day. You can follow him on twitter @rogerpatterson and get a copy of his book at www.rogerpatterson.squarespace.com.


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