TWCA's three-way player is VYPE "BIG MAN ON CAMPUS" powered by Sweeney Foot and Ankle

VYPE

Originally Appeared on VYPE

Aaron Monsivaiz goes out and gets what he wants.

The three-way stud at The Woodlands Christian Academy set out to be the quarterback of the Warriors after the 2018 season. Mission accomplished.

Did we mention that he's also an all-everything linebacker on defense and a talented long-snapper?

"I was rotating with another guy last season at QB, but was mostly playing on defense," the senior said. "I was getting some reps and doing well but I just broke out at linebacker. I was fine with that and just did whatever the team needed.

"After the season, I just had it in my mind that I was going to be the starting QB and linebacker as a senior. I put in the work in the offseason and during 7-on-7 and it paid off."

Monsivaiz has helped lead the Warriors to a 4-0 record entering this weekend's game with Bay Area Christian. He's thrown for 450 yards and nine scores while rushing for 125 yards and another two TDs.

"I'm a pro-style quarterback – my first option is always to throw the ball," he said. "When I'm forced to run, I have more of a linebacker's mentality and run over people instead of making them miss."

This kid literally never leaves the field.

"It's taxing, but I'm going to do what I need to for the team," he said. "It's hard in the moment but I wouldn't want it any other way."


Read more here

VYPE

Originally Appeared on VYPE

KINGWOOD - The true impact of a coach can't always measured by the number of win and losses, the number of district championships or even runs at a state title.

This story goes beyond any of that.

In reality, the impact a coach is seen whenever they become the one that is in need of the support that they have been providing to others their entire career.

Kingwood girls soccer coach Pres Holcomb, who is set to begin chemotherapy to battle Stage 4 colon cancer, which he was diagnosed with on December 20, is seeing his impact as the Kingwood and soccer community has rallied around him and his family with messages, wristbands, t-shirts, donations and more.

"It's overwhelming in a good way," Holcomb said. "It's kind of crazy when you see your own name across stuff like that. Once we went public with it, the support has been amazing. People you haven't talked to in years are reaching out to you."

Since they've gone public with it the "Hope for Holcomb" campaign has taken off.

The soccer team - which was told about Holcomb's battle in a group setting - created blue wristbands with the phrase on them. It started with the girls wearing them during matches and expanded to them being sold at different places in the community.

They started by ordering just 300.

Then an order of 500 more was needed and that still wasn't enough. The wristbands have sold more than 1,000.

"You don't even think you know that many people," Holcomb said.

- CLICK HERE TO DONATE -

More here

SportsMap Emails
Are Awesome