WATSON HAS TO BE ON POINT

Week 11 fantasy football rankings: Call your shot

Deshaun Watson was magical in the win. Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

These are my very early ranks, so keep in mind I post these on Thursday. Make sure you check the injury report on Sunday for players that have missed practice. If it doesn't look like a player will play this week, I typically won't rank him. Keep in mind, these are PPR rankings, and don't forget to set your lineup for Thursday Night Football.

If you have any questions, feel free to hit me up on Twitter. Be sure to check out my show MoneyLine with Jerry Bo on ESPN 97.5FM. We're on every Sunday morning from 10-noon, and we'll talk a lot of fantasy football and NFL gambling getting you ready for kickoff every Sunday.

@JoshJordan975

@Moneyline975

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QB

Photo via: Raiders/Facebook

1 Lamar Jackson

2 Patrick Mahomes

3 Drew Brees

4 Dak Prescott

5 Deshaun Watson

6 Josh Allen

7 Jimmy Garoppolo

8 Derek Carr

9 Tom Brady

10 Philip Rivers

11 Matt Ryan

12 Jameis Winston

13 Kirk Cousins

14 Carson Wentz

15 Kyle Allen

RB

Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

1 Christian McCaffrey

2 Ezekiel Elliott

3 Dalvin Cook

4 Melvin Gordon

5 Josh Jacobs

6 Alvin Kamara

7 Leonard Fournette

8 James Conner

9 Le'Veon Bell

10 Tevin Coleman

11 Mark Ingram

12 Nick Chubb

13 Damien Williams

14 Austin Ekeler

15 James White

16 Devin Singletary

17 Brian Hill

18 Todd Gurley

19 Marlon Mack

20 Ronald Jones

21 Joe Mixon

22 Phillip Lindsay

23 Kenyan Drake

24 Jordan Howard

25 David Montgomery

26 JD McKissic

27 Miles Sanders

28 Tarek Cohen

29 Kareem Hunt

30 Royce Freeman

*I'm done with David Johnson until he proves he's healthy.

WR

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1 Michael Thomas

2 Tyreek Hill

3 Julio Jones

4 Amari Cooper

5 Mike Evans

6 Julian Edelman

7 Chris Godwin

8 DeAndre Hopkins

9 Cooper Kupp

10 D.J. Moore

11 Keenan Allen

12 D.J. Chark

13 John Brown

14 Robert Woods

15 Marquise Brown

16 Kenny Golladay

17 Odell Beckham

18 Michael Gallup

19 Tyrell Williams

20 Stefon Diggs

21 Courtland Sutton

22 Jamison Crowder

23 Jarvis Landry

24 Christian Kirk

25 Curtis Samuel

26 Deebo Samuel

27 Sammy Watkins

28 JuJu Smith-Schuster

29 Calvin Ridley

30 Allen Robinson

31 Tyler Boyd

32 Dede Westbrook

33 Terry McLaurin

34 Mike Williams

35 Marvin Jones

36 Mohamed Sanu

*I'm assuming Emmanuel Sanders won't play, but we'll have to see if he's active. He's a risk/reward low-end No.2 fantasy receiver for me this week.

TE

1 Travis Kelce

2 Hunter Henry

3 Darren Waller

4 Mark Andrews

5 Zach Ertz

6 Greg Olsen

7 Jared Cook

8 Gerald Everett

9 Eric Ebron

10 OJ Howard

11 Jason Witten

12 Jack Doyle

13 T.J. Hockenson

14 Dallas Goedert

15 David Fells

DEF

1 Rams

2 Bills

3 Vikings

4 Cowboys

5 Steelers

6 Patriots

7 Bears

8 49ers

9 Raiders

10 Saints

11 Jets

12 Jaguars

KICKER

1 Justin Tucker

2 Harrison Butker

3 Wil Lutz

4 Greg Zuerlein

5 Joey Slye

6 Michael Badgley

7 Dan Bailey

8 Brett Maher

9 Zane Gonzalez

10 Matt Prater

11 Ka'imi Fairbairn

12 Nick Folk

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College football needs to call a timeout on the 2020 season.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 are set to announce, maybe today, perhaps in a few weeks, whether they will play football this fall.

Already the Ivy League, Mountain West and Mid-American Conference have canceled their fall football season for health and safety reasons amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Power 5 conferences – the Big Ten, Pac-12, Atlantic Coast Conference, Big 12 and Southeastern Conference – should get onboard and put their football seasons on hold, too.

While some elected officials without medical degrees say that coronavirus amounts to little more than sniffles for young people, healthcare experts argue that college-age people, while they do recover quickly and may not exhibit symptoms, do contract and spread the virus.

There has been a 90 percent increase of young people testing positive for the virus in the past four weeks. More important, health experts say they can't measure the long-term effects of the virus, which may include brain damage, heart disease and reduced lung capacity.

There is a simple solution to play or not play college football this fall – postpone the season to next spring, when health experts will know more about the disease. There possibly could be a vaccine by then, which would allow fans back in stadiums.

Many high-profile college players and coaches weighed in on the debate Monday, almost unanimously saying that the 2020 football schedule should be played on schedule, starting in a few weeks.

Players, including Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, adopted the hashtag #WeWantToPlay. In a tweet, Lawrence said that players would be more at risk for coronavirus if the fall season doesn't move forward. "We are more likely to get the virus in everyday life than playing football."

Lawrence added that, if the football season is canceled or postponed, players "will be sent home to their own communities where social distancing is highly unlikely."

Alabama coach Nick Saban told ESPN, "Look, players are a lot safer with us than they are running around at home."

Two points: University presidents should listen to only one group of people – healthcare professionals – when they decide whether to cancel or postpone the fall football season. Yes, players want to play during this pandemic. But players also want to play when they are injured or their brain was just scrambled by a vicious tackle. We applaud athletes who play with a broken leg. We see players with concussions plead with their coaches to put them back in the game.

As for the argument that players are more likely to catch the virus if they're sent home – who's sending them home? These are student-athletes. Students. Most college campuses will be open with students attending classes this fall. Major college programs like Clemson have 85 full scholarships designated for football. Colleges won't take away players' scholarships if the football season is canceled. Clemson's campus will open Sept. 21 for in-person classes.

ESPN college football analyst Greg McElroy also said the season should be played as scheduled: "If they're (players) OK, then I'm OK." Texas governor Greg Abbott chimed in on the players' side. He said, "It's their careers, it's their health."

What "careers" is he talking about? There are about 775 colleges that play football. Only 1.7 percent of all those players will play in the NFL or another professional league. On Sept. 3, Rice University will play Army. It is unlikely that any of those players will have a career in football. However, given the excellence of academics at those colleges, players will have career opportunities in something other than football. The average NFL career is 2-1/2 years. Rice and Army grads can top that.

The NBA is completing its season in a bubble in Orlando, with players confined to their hotels between games. Only 22 teams are in Orlando for the lockdown. The Rockets organization sent about 35 people, including coaches, players and essential personnel to Orlando.

Baseball is playing its season outside a bubble. So many players are testing positive for coronavirus that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred last week threatened to end the season if teams don't do a better job of enforcing the league's health protocol. What's left is an unbalanced season. For example, the Atlanta Braves and Seattle Mariners have played 18 games, while the St. Louis Cardinals have played only five games. The ironically first-place Miami Marlins, which had 18 players test positive, have played only 10 games.

College football can't be played in a bubble. There are too many teams, with some having more than 100 players and 20 coaches. And no sport thrives on fans' excitement and marching bands like college football. Several colleges, including the University of Texas and Texas A&M, have stadiums that hold more than 100,000 fans. Even if college football could be played in a bubble, it would require isolating players from August to January, when they're supposed to be in class. I know … supposed.

This one is easy. For the health and safety of players, play the fall 2020 season in spring 2021.

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