Weekly Rockets Roundup

Westbrook questions, Iggy rumors, and summer league stars

Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Wednesday's already back again and that means it's time for another recap for all things Rockets.

Westbrook reunion

It was about a week ago that I suggested the Rockets' chances of grabbing Russell Westbrook were slim to none, and then about a day later I was eating crow. Now that the dust has settled there are still plenty of questions still but a few things have been cleared up.

It looks as though the Rockets intend to employ the same staggered approach with regard to James Harden and Westbrook's minutes. The strategy allows both players plenty of on ball time and keeps the pressure on an opponent's starters and bench. It's a highly effective regular season tactic, but it will be imperative to their playoff success to give the two stars ample opportunities to learn how to share the court. This is important because Harden rarely leaves the court in the postseason.

That's where the questions arise. Are Russ and Harden a good fit? Could the stage be set for massive implosion due to conflicting play styles, or will the two stars adapt and acquiesce to one another when need be? Can D'Antoni find a way to scheme around Westbrook's inefficient outside shot? More importantly, who will come better dressed night in and night out. Harden and Westbrook may be in the running for best on-court duo on the league, but they are hands down the most fashion-forward.

Tyson Chandler signs

Shortly after news of the Westbrook deal broke, veteran center Tyson Chandler signed a one year deal. A former defensive player of the year, Chandler has obviously lost a step but still provides valuable depth behind Clint Capela. Capela has been prone to injuries throughout his young career, and last season his absence was felt with Nene and Isaiah Hartenstein left to carry the load.

Iggy rumors remain

Since the acquisition of Westbrook, it has been rumored that the Rockets are focused on acquiring longtime target Andre Igoudala via trade with Memphis. Igoudala was aggressively pursued by the Rockets in free agency in 2017, but at the last minute chose to remain with the Golden State Warriors. The current hangup between the two sides revolves around Houston's reluctance to dive further into the luxury tax to take on what could be a one-year rental.

The Rockets may seem silly for prioritizing the acquisition of a 35 year old player who averaged 5.7 ppg last season, but make no mistake. This isn't a move for the regular season, and it's not for a starting spot. Igoudala's presence on the Rockets would serve as an almost identical role as the one Carlos Beltran provided to the Astros in 2017: a mentor who can still play. Even more so, he remains a defensive pest and is as clutch as they come.

Parting shot

The Rockets finished their summer league schedule with a 3-2 record, but may have found a diamond in the rough. Keep an eye on Chris Clemons, who was white-hot throughout. Clemons averaged 20.8 points per game to go with 5 3-pointers per game. It's possible he could be called up as a spark off the bench, but at 5'9" he'll have a difficult time proving that he isn't a defensive liability.

10 QUESTIONS FOR TILMAN FERTITTA

Tilman Fertitta wants you to shut up and listen with new book

Photo by J. Thomas Ford

This article originally appeared on CultureMap.

Tilman Fertitta can't lose. Sitting in his palatial office nestled in the towering Post Oak Hotel in Uptown, the sole owner of Fertitta Entertainment, the restaurant giant Landry's, the Golden Nugget Casinos and Hotels, and the NBA's Houston Rockets — not to mention the star of the TV reality show Billion Dollar Buyer — is taking a quick moment to bask in his success.

And why not? On top of being the world's richest restauranteur and Houston's most recognizable billionaire, Fertitta currently boasts a best seller with his new business book, Shut Up and Listen! As CultureMap reported, he just acquired Del Frisco's luxury steakhouse chain, adding to his impressive and extensive restaurant empire. And speaking of acquisitions: Soon, his Houston Rockets will unleash the powerhouse duo of James Harden and new teammate Russell Westbrook, who came to Houston in a massive trade with Oklahoma City.

Fertitta has just made the national media rounds promoting Shut Up and Listen! and looked quite comfortable doing so. "A lot of owners don't talk to the media and they don't know how to do it," he tells CultureMap, "but I've been doing it for 30 years and it just doesn't phase me."Shut Up and Listen! is a Tilman tell-all. But rather than a life story, the book is a how-to for the business-minded. No-nonsense nuggets such as the "Tilmanisms" teach principles such as the 95/5 rule (focus on the 5 percent of the operation that isn't perfect and fix it) and offer hardcore reminders such as "when things are bad, eat the weak and grow your business." Doubters, take note: Shut Up has landed on the Publishers Weekly's and USA Today's Best Sellers lists.

CultureMap sat down with Fertitta during a rare break to talk books, business, and his beloved Bayou City.

CultureMap: You’re a Texan titan of industry, a major local benefactor, you own one of the most buzzworthy teams in all of pro sports, and you’re the star of your own reality TV show. Can we now say — in Houston — that you’re way bigger than Mark Cuban?

Tilman Fertitta: [Laughs] Oh, I don't know about that. Mark is a special guy and we're lucky to have him in Texas.

CM: You’ve been actively involved with the Rockets and the University of Houston sports programs. Using your 95/5 rule, can you share any of the 5 percent of what you found wrong with the Rockets and UH?

TF: At UH, the 5 percent was we wanted to have good coaches and we wanted to improve our facilities. That's the 5 percent we realized that if we wanted to compete at the highest level of basketball and football, that's what we'd have to do.

For the Rockets, we're gonna make sure we can put the basketball team we can on the court with the best coaches every single year. I'm not a sit-on-my-hands guy — it's let's keep getting better.

CM: Why is giving back to your hometown important to you?

TF: This is where I grew up and Houston's been very good to me. I've been around a long time and I've watched people come and go in the '80s, the '90s, the 2000s, and the 2010s. It's fun to have lasted this long and been a player through so many decades.

CM: There’s an old adage that says, ‘Do one thing and do it well.’ But you’re doing a lot of things well. When do you know, as a business owner, to diversify?

TF: Systems and operations are very important. Everybody wants to do more deals. If you understand the Big Box Theory, you make more out of a bigger box. In the beginning, I knew I always wanted to be successful. Today, I know what I know and I know — and what I don't know.

Continue on CultureMap to learn which books inspired Tilman Fertitta, and much more.

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