Who was the worst?

Examining which team signed the worst free agent in Houston sports history

There are four players in particular that two Houston teams regret signing, but who are they?

At the number one spot is Brock Osweiler who was brought here from the Denver Broncos. Osweiler signed a four-year contract for $72 million on March 9th, 2016. Houstonians thought it was an answer from God, but things did not go as planned. Osweiler was not successful for the Houston Texans. He got benched in week 15 against the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Houston crowd actually cheered when he was benched.

Osweiler eventually regained his starting job because of Tom Savage's concussion in week 17. There were multiple rumors that Osweiler and Bill O'Brien got into a heated discussion in the Titans' locker room. Even though Osweiler won a playoff game, he went 8-6 as a starting quarterback, and had a disappointing 15 touchdowns and 16 interceptions. After the season, Houston was able to get rid of the contract by trading him to the Cleveland Browns along with Houston's 2nd round pick. The Osweiler chapter was closed.

Coming in second is Ahman Green who the Texans signed from the Green Bay Packers. Green was a four-time Pro Bowler with the Packers, and signed a four-year 23 million dollar deal with the Texans. The hope was that he would bring his skills to Houston and have a great finish to his career. He struggled with the death of his father, a family feud with his daughter, and a knee injury. Green only played six games, ran for 250 yards, and only had two touchdowns. This was not a good signing by the Texans to say the least.

In third place is Ed Reed who signed a three-year 15 million dollar deal with the Texans. At the time Reed had just won a Super Bowl with the Ravens in 2013, was a nine-time pro-bowler, and was still looked at as one of the best safeties in football. The Texans did not get off to a good start that season. Reed only had 16 tackles in six games and lost his starting job after making his debut against the Ravens week 3. Houston was 2-7 after a 27-24 loss to the Arizona Cardinals. Reed made comments that questioned the coaching on the Texans staff. When those comments were made, the Texans released him.


Texans To Release Ed Reed - SportsCenter (11-12-2013) youtu.be


In fourth place is Scottie Pippen who signed a five-year 67 million dollar deal with the Houston Rockets. Pippen wanted to team up with Hakeem Olajuwon and Charles Barkley to win a championship. He mentioned on ESPN's The Jump that the Rockets wanted him to be a three-point shooter while Olajuwon and Barkley posted up. Pippen only played 50 games while averaging 14.5 points per game. The seven-time All-Star and six-time champion did not plan out in Houston. Barkley was upset and wanted an apology from Pippen after asking for a trade to leave Houston. Pippen felt like Barkley did not work hard enough to win a championship, and many Houston fans believed that Pippen quit on the Rockets.


Pippen vs Barkley's "sorry fat butt" youtu.be


There you have it.

There are plenty of other bad contracts that did not get discussed, so feel free to mention them on Twitter and Facebook.

Hopefully, Houston teams have learned from their mistakes.

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College football needs to call a timeout on the 2020 season.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 are set to announce, maybe today, perhaps in a few weeks, whether they will play football this fall.

Already the Ivy League, Mountain West and Mid-American Conference have canceled their fall football season for health and safety reasons amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Power 5 conferences – the Big Ten, Pac-12, Atlantic Coast Conference, Big 12 and Southeastern Conference – should get onboard and put their football seasons on hold, too.

While some elected officials without medical degrees say that coronavirus amounts to little more than sniffles for young people, healthcare experts argue that college-age people, while they do recover quickly and may not exhibit symptoms, do contract and spread the virus.

There has been a 90 percent increase of young people testing positive for the virus in the past four weeks. More important, health experts say they can't measure the long-term effects of the virus, which may include brain damage, heart disease and reduced lung capacity.

There is a simple solution to play or not play college football this fall – postpone the season to next spring, when health experts will know more about the disease. There possibly could be a vaccine by then, which would allow fans back in stadiums.

Many high-profile college players and coaches weighed in on the debate Monday, almost unanimously saying that the 2020 football schedule should be played on schedule, starting in a few weeks.

Players, including Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, adopted the hashtag #WeWantToPlay. In a tweet, Lawrence said that players would be more at risk for coronavirus if the fall season doesn't move forward. "We are more likely to get the virus in everyday life than playing football."

Lawrence added that, if the football season is canceled or postponed, players "will be sent home to their own communities where social distancing is highly unlikely."

Alabama coach Nick Saban told ESPN, "Look, players are a lot safer with us than they are running around at home."

Two points: University presidents should listen to only one group of people – healthcare professionals – when they decide whether to cancel or postpone the fall football season. Yes, players want to play during this pandemic. But players also want to play when they are injured or their brain was just scrambled by a vicious tackle. We applaud athletes who play with a broken leg. We see players with concussions plead with their coaches to put them back in the game.

As for the argument that players are more likely to catch the virus if they're sent home – who's sending them home? These are student-athletes. Students. Most college campuses will be open with students attending classes this fall. Major college programs like Clemson have 85 full scholarships designated for football. Colleges won't take away players' scholarships if the football season is canceled. Clemson's campus will open Sept. 21 for in-person classes.

ESPN college football analyst Greg McElroy also said the season should be played as scheduled: "If they're (players) OK, then I'm OK." Texas governor Greg Abbott chimed in on the players' side. He said, "It's their careers, it's their health."

What "careers" is he talking about? There are about 775 colleges that play football. Only 1.7 percent of all those players will play in the NFL or another professional league. On Sept. 3, Rice University will play Army. It is unlikely that any of those players will have a career in football. However, given the excellence of academics at those colleges, players will have career opportunities in something other than football. The average NFL career is 2-1/2 years. Rice and Army grads can top that.

The NBA is completing its season in a bubble in Orlando, with players confined to their hotels between games. Only 22 teams are in Orlando for the lockdown. The Rockets organization sent about 35 people, including coaches, players and essential personnel to Orlando.

Baseball is playing its season outside a bubble. So many players are testing positive for coronavirus that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred last week threatened to end the season if teams don't do a better job of enforcing the league's health protocol. What's left is an unbalanced season. For example, the Atlanta Braves and Seattle Mariners have played 18 games, while the St. Louis Cardinals have played only five games. The ironically first-place Miami Marlins, which had 18 players test positive, have played only 10 games.

College football can't be played in a bubble. There are too many teams, with some having more than 100 players and 20 coaches. And no sport thrives on fans' excitement and marching bands like college football. Several colleges, including the University of Texas and Texas A&M, have stadiums that hold more than 100,000 fans. Even if college football could be played in a bubble, it would require isolating players from August to January, when they're supposed to be in class. I know … supposed.

This one is easy. For the health and safety of players, play the fall 2020 season in spring 2021.

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