The Cyclones play a big one while other offenses hope to keep rolling

Big 12 Report: Texas takes step back

@LSUfootball

Texas comes close

The Longhorns couldn't get it done. They played their ass off in their second half but the Tigers were too tough down the stretch. Joe Burrow made every throw he needed to make and is clearly not last year's Joe Burrow. The Texas offense was inconsistent on the ground but got some solid runs from Roschon Johnson.

I truly believe if Keaontay Ingram doesn't drop the touchdown early Texas wins. I also believe if Todd Orlando doesn't blitz on 3rd and 17 in the fourth quarter Texas wins as well. Just a baffling move by Orlando.

Texas is clearly an elite team, but LSU was just better Saturday night. The Longhorns have no margin for error if they have designs on a playoff berth. Only perfection from here on out can get them into the playoff. That likely means two wins over Oklahoma.

Three studs

Texas WR Devin Duvernay

When Texas needed something, they found Duvernay. He finished the day with 154 yards on 12 catches with two scores. He was a key player all night and in the biggest moments he was making plays in Austin.

Oklahoma State WR Tylan Wallace

How about five catches in back to back weeks. This week though, Wallace made it even better. He almost doubled his week one yardage total with 180 yards and added an extra score over week one with three touchdowns this week. He's a talented pass catcher in a conference loaded with them.

Must-watch game: The Battle for the Cy-Hawk Trophy

Iowa State and Iowa play for potentially the worst-named trophy in sports in the Cy-Hawk Trophy. That being said, this game is usually very fun to watch. Iowa has won four straight and Iowa State isn't nearly as talented as last year but with College Gameday in town, and potentially the last year with Cyclones coach Matt Campbell coaching in this one, it should be a blast.

This game also has a decent implication for the Big 12 as a whole. Imagine if Iowa State beats ranked Iowa and is undefeated on Nov. 11 when they play Oklahoma. That would be a huge feather in the Sooners cap or put the Cyclones in the Big 12 driver's seat.

Who better ball

TCU's safeties

They have to try to cover Rondale Moore. Oh my. One of the most dynamic players in the nation will be a tough cover. Vanderbilt had trouble with him and they're better on defense than TCU. That being said, TCU sees spread success each year. It will be fun to see if they can contain the Heisman candidate.

Iowa State RB Johnnie Lang

When you are playing Iowa you are going to have to match their physicality. Lang has to be able to run the ball, you can't just throw and throw against Iowa that won't work. Lang will have to help the Cyclones control the clock if they have a lead. If they are behind, they have to keep some semblance of balance

Big 12 Rankings

1. Oklahoma

2. Oklahoma State

3. Texas

4. Baylor

5. Texas Tech

6. TCU

7. Iowa State

8. Kansas State

9. West Virginia

10. Kansas

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College football needs to call a timeout on the 2020 season.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 are set to announce, maybe today, perhaps in a few weeks, whether they will play football this fall.

Already the Ivy League, Mountain West and Mid-American Conference have canceled their fall football season for health and safety reasons amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Power 5 conferences – the Big Ten, Pac-12, Atlantic Coast Conference, Big 12 and Southeastern Conference – should get onboard and put their football seasons on hold, too.

While some elected officials without medical degrees say that coronavirus amounts to little more than sniffles for young people, healthcare experts argue that college-age people, while they do recover quickly and may not exhibit symptoms, do contract and spread the virus.

There has been a 90 percent increase of young people testing positive for the virus in the past four weeks. More important, health experts say they can't measure the long-term effects of the virus, which may include brain damage, heart disease and reduced lung capacity.

There is a simple solution to play or not play college football this fall – postpone the season to next spring, when health experts will know more about the disease. There possibly could be a vaccine by then, which would allow fans back in stadiums.

Many high-profile college players and coaches weighed in on the debate Monday, almost unanimously saying that the 2020 football schedule should be played on schedule, starting in a few weeks.

Players, including Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, adopted the hashtag #WeWantToPlay. In a tweet, Lawrence said that players would be more at risk for coronavirus if the fall season doesn't move forward. "We are more likely to get the virus in everyday life than playing football."

Lawrence added that, if the football season is canceled or postponed, players "will be sent home to their own communities where social distancing is highly unlikely."

Alabama coach Nick Saban told ESPN, "Look, players are a lot safer with us than they are running around at home."

Two points: University presidents should listen to only one group of people – healthcare professionals – when they decide whether to cancel or postpone the fall football season. Yes, players want to play during this pandemic. But players also want to play when they are injured or their brain was just scrambled by a vicious tackle. We applaud athletes who play with a broken leg. We see players with concussions plead with their coaches to put them back in the game.

As for the argument that players are more likely to catch the virus if they're sent home – who's sending them home? These are student-athletes. Students. Most college campuses will be open with students attending classes this fall. Major college programs like Clemson have 85 full scholarships designated for football. Colleges won't take away players' scholarships if the football season is canceled. Clemson's campus will open Sept. 21 for in-person classes.

ESPN college football analyst Greg McElroy also said the season should be played as scheduled: "If they're (players) OK, then I'm OK." Texas governor Greg Abbott chimed in on the players' side. He said, "It's their careers, it's their health."

What "careers" is he talking about? There are about 775 colleges that play football. Only 1.7 percent of all those players will play in the NFL or another professional league. On Sept. 3, Rice University will play Army. It is unlikely that any of those players will have a career in football. However, given the excellence of academics at those colleges, players will have career opportunities in something other than football. The average NFL career is 2-1/2 years. Rice and Army grads can top that.

The NBA is completing its season in a bubble in Orlando, with players confined to their hotels between games. Only 22 teams are in Orlando for the lockdown. The Rockets organization sent about 35 people, including coaches, players and essential personnel to Orlando.

Baseball is playing its season outside a bubble. So many players are testing positive for coronavirus that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred last week threatened to end the season if teams don't do a better job of enforcing the league's health protocol. What's left is an unbalanced season. For example, the Atlanta Braves and Seattle Mariners have played 18 games, while the St. Louis Cardinals have played only five games. The ironically first-place Miami Marlins, which had 18 players test positive, have played only 10 games.

College football can't be played in a bubble. There are too many teams, with some having more than 100 players and 20 coaches. And no sport thrives on fans' excitement and marching bands like college football. Several colleges, including the University of Texas and Texas A&M, have stadiums that hold more than 100,000 fans. Even if college football could be played in a bubble, it would require isolating players from August to January, when they're supposed to be in class. I know … supposed.

This one is easy. For the health and safety of players, play the fall 2020 season in spring 2021.

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