XFL 3.0?

If the Houston Roughnecks return, it could play out like pro wrestling drama

Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images.

You remember when Vince McMahon declared bankruptcy for his twice-flopped XFL and laid off all its players, coaches and front office personnel last month? Now there are reports that a mystery shopper is writing a deposit check to buy the XFL out of bankruptcy and resume play next year. And who's that throwing good money at a snakebitten football league?

The rumor is Vince McMahon. Well, somebody is reinstating XFL stadium leases in Seattle and St. Louis. If true, 2021 would mark McMahon's third attempt at getting the XFL off the ground. What's that definition of insanity?

Some underperforming XFL teams may relocate to markets abandoned by the NFL, like San Diego and Oakland. While most XFL teams faced free-falling TV ratings and downsizing attendance in 2020, and former XFL commissioner Oliver Luck is suing the league for wrongful termination, the Houston Roughnecks appear to be on firm artificial turf at TDECU Stadium on the UH campus. The Roughnecks were the undisputed crown jewel, the high-scoring dazzlers of the XFL 2020. They were the only undefeated team, standing at 5-0 with a 3-game lead in the Western Division when the plug was pulled in March, a victim of the COVID shutdown. Their average attendance was 18,230, good for third in the 8-team league. If the season had completed its 10-game regular season, the XFL title game would have been played in Houston. Our city clearly was the capital of the XFL.

A poll of XFL writers named Roughnecks quarterback P.J. Walker as the league's projected offensive MVP. Roughnecks' June Jones was the midway Coach of the Year. Receiver Cam Phillips was the XFL's "Star of the Week" three of the five weeks the league played games. Unlike that other pro football team in Houston, the Roughnecks did not trade their superstar receiver for a broken-down running back and a bag of used kicking tees.

After the season unexpectedly wrapped, six Roughnecks signed NFL contracts, the most of any XFL team: quarterback P.J. Walker (Carolina Panthers), cornerback Deatrick Nichols (New Orleans Saints), linebacker DeMarquis Gates (Minnesota Vikings), linebacker Edmond Robinson (Atlanta Falcons), and cornerback Savion Smith (Dallas Cowboys). Two more Roughnecks signed deals with the Canadian Football League: kicker Sergio Castillo (BC Lions) and receiver Jalen Saunders (Ottawa Redblacks). The bad news is, if the XFL returns, you might not be able to tell the Roughnecks without a scorecard.

While McMahon possibly is bringing back the XFL, his World Wrestling Entertainment is struggling to put on original live programming with Monday Night Raw, Wednesday Night NXT and Friday Night Smackdown in the WWE's empty Performance Center in Florida - God love it, the only state where professional wrestling is considered an "essential service."

Monday Night Raw debuted in January, 1993 and airs live, 3-hour shows 52 weeks a year. It is the longest-running episodic show in TV history. That's 1,408 weekly shows and counting. Second longest running episodic show – Friday Night Smackdown with 1,014 shows. Then comes NFL Monday Night Football with 718 games.

Earlier this month, Raw sunk to its lowest number of viewers ever, only 1.68 million fans for the May 4 episode. To be fair, pro wrestling is hard to watch, and very strange, without a live crowd cheering on the babyfaces and jeering the heels. WWE puts on 500 live events a year, but not 2020 with COVID-19 shutting down arenas worldwide and canceling lucrative U.S. and international tours. WrestleMania was canceled for the first time last month. WWE's last blockbuster live show was the Royal Rumble, which packed Minute Maid Park with 42,715 fans in January.

Last month, shareholders hit WWE with several class action lawsuits claiming that WWE lied about business opportunities while WWE executives unloaded stock in advance of troubling financial reports. Two of WWE's most bankable stars, Roman Reigns and Becky Lynch, are on the sidelines. Reigns is sitting out the coronavirus pandemic for health concerns. Lynch announced last week that she is expecting her first child. Last month, WWE laid off dozens of wrestlers and furloughed some veteran staff to the coronavirus crisis. Comic Tom Segura grabbed headlines this month when he called wrestling fans "retards, in the same category as flat-Earthers." WWE is facing a new rival for ratings on Wednesdays with the debut of All Elite Wrestling on TBS.

With all that happening, or not happening, a rumor is ratting WWE fans … is Vince McMahon negotiating to sell WWE and the WWE Network to ESPN and Fox? The buzz started last month when former WWE performer Dutch Mantell tweeted:

"Huge News: Any truth to this? Overheard directly out of WWE headquarters (in) Stamford (Connecticut) is that a deal is being negotiated to sell WWE & the network to ESPN and Fox as early as Mid May."

Mid May sounds about right now.

Although pro wrestling performers are known for being big fat fibbers, and they don't call Mantell "Dirty Dutch" for nothing, just maybe there's something to McMahon selling.

Vince McMahon, chairman and CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment, is 74 years old. He bought WWE from his father and investors for $1 million in 1982. WWE is now worth $5.7 billion, and McMahon's personal wealth is estimated at $3.2. That's Oprah territory. That's more than Mr. Wonderful is worth on Shark Tank. WWE isn't just a wrestling company. McMahon sits atop an entertainment empire that includes movies, TV, music, magazines, toys and video games. WWE television shows air in 150 countries. He is one of the great owners in sports history, more than willing to strap it on and get down and dirty with his performers. Let me know when Jerry Jones or Tilman Fertitta lets Donald Trump shave his head bald on pay-per-view like McMahon did. McMahon is committed, all right, or should be.

What's he knocking himself out for? He could sell WWE to ESPN and Fox, and insist that son-in-law Triple H and daughter Stephanie McMahon are retained in executive positions. McMahon could cash out his billions, take a deep breath, and concentrate on losing a big chunk of it next year with XFL 3.0.

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After the big offensive showing to take the opener on Thursday, the Astros entered Friday's game at Globe Life Field against the Rangers just one win or Angels loss away from securing their spot in the playoffs. Here is how the game unfolded:

Final Score (10 innings): Rangers 5, Astros 4.

Record: 29-29, second in the AL West.

Winning pitcher: Brett Martin (1-1, 1.98 ERA).

Losing pitcher: Enoli Paredes (3-3, 3.05 ERA).

Urquidy goes seven while allowing two

The Rangers would strike first in Friday's game, getting a two-out solo home run against Jose Urquidy in the bottom of the second to grab the early 1-0 lead. Urquidy did relatively well on the night, though he would allow another solo homer in the bottom of the fifth. Those were the only two runs he allowed, working in and out of some trouble throughout the game on his way to finishing seven innings. His final line: 7.0 IP, 7 H, 2 R, 2 ER, 0 BB, 5 K, 2 HR, 98 P.

Houston grabs their first lead late

Unlike their hot night at the plate the night prior, it took the Astros until the fifth inning to get on the board. It came after Carlos Correa hit a leadoff single, then came all the way around to score on an RBI-triple by George Springer, making it a 1-1 tie at the time.

After the Rangers went back in front 2-1 in the bottom of the inning on their second solo homer of the night, Alex Bregman would tie it up again with a solo home run of his own, making it 2-2. Houston would get their first lead of the night in the top of the eighth, with Altuve working a leadoff walk before scoring later in the inning on an RBI-single by Yuli Gurriel.

Rangers get the walk-off to keep Houston waiting for playoff bid

After Urquidy, Blake Taylor would take over on the mound in the bottom of the eighth, retiring the Rangers in order for a scoreless inning to hold the one-run lead. Still 3-2 in the bottom of the ninth, Houston turned to their closer, Ryan Pressly. After two quick outs, he would allow a game-tying solo home run, making it 3-3 to postpone Houston's celebration at least another inning as the game headed to extras.

In the top of the tenth, Jose Altuve was placed on second as the free runner. He advanced to third on a groundout to start the inning, then scored on a sac fly by Alex Bregman, making it a 4-3 lead for Houston. Enoli Paredes would load the bases before Texas would tie the game on a sac fly in the bottom of the inning, keeping runners on second and third. Houston made the change to Brooks Raley to try and extend the game another inning, but instead, the Rangers would get the walk-off win, spoiling Houston's chance to clinch their playoff spot themselves with a win.

Up Next: The third game of this four-game set will get underway at 6:05 PM Central on Saturday. On the mound for Texas will be Kyle Gibson (2-6, 5.87 ERA), and, as of now, the Astros still have Lance McCullers Jr. (3-3, 4.24 ERA) listed as their starter.

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