SPRING FORWARD

There's an easy solution for how college football should handle the season

Photo Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images

College football needs to call a timeout on the 2020 season.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 are set to announce, maybe today, perhaps in a few weeks, whether they will play football this fall.

Already the Ivy League, Mountain West and Mid-American Conference have canceled their fall football season for health and safety reasons amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Power 5 conferences – the Big Ten, Pac-12, Atlantic Coast Conference, Big 12 and Southeastern Conference – should get onboard and put their football seasons on hold, too.

While some elected officials without medical degrees say that coronavirus amounts to little more than sniffles for young people, healthcare experts argue that college-age people, while they do recover quickly and may not exhibit symptoms, do contract and spread the virus.

There has been a 90 percent increase of young people testing positive for the virus in the past four weeks. More important, health experts say they can't measure the long-term effects of the virus, which may include brain damage, heart disease and reduced lung capacity.

There is a simple solution to play or not play college football this fall – postpone the season to next spring, when health experts will know more about the disease. There possibly could be a vaccine by then, which would allow fans back in stadiums.

Many high-profile college players and coaches weighed in on the debate Monday, almost unanimously saying that the 2020 football schedule should be played on schedule, starting in a few weeks.

Players, including Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, adopted the hashtag #WeWantToPlay. In a tweet, Lawrence said that players would be more at risk for coronavirus if the fall season doesn't move forward. "We are more likely to get the virus in everyday life than playing football."

Lawrence added that, if the football season is canceled or postponed, players "will be sent home to their own communities where social distancing is highly unlikely."

Alabama coach Nick Saban told ESPN, "Look, players are a lot safer with us than they are running around at home."

Two points: University presidents should listen to only one group of people – healthcare professionals – when they decide whether to cancel or postpone the fall football season. Yes, players want to play during this pandemic. But players also want to play when they are injured or their brain was just scrambled by a vicious tackle. We applaud athletes who play with a broken leg. We see players with concussions plead with their coaches to put them back in the game.

As for the argument that players are more likely to catch the virus if they're sent home – who's sending them home? These are student-athletes. Students. Most college campuses will be open with students attending classes this fall. Major college programs like Clemson have 85 full scholarships designated for football. Colleges won't take away players' scholarships if the football season is canceled. Clemson's campus will open Sept. 21 for in-person classes.

ESPN college football analyst Greg McElroy also said the season should be played as scheduled: "If they're (players) OK, then I'm OK." Texas governor Greg Abbott chimed in on the players' side. He said, "It's their careers, it's their health."

What "careers" is he talking about? There are about 775 colleges that play football. Only 1.7 percent of all those players will play in the NFL or another professional league. On Sept. 3, Rice University will play Army. It is unlikely that any of those players will have a career in football. However, given the excellence of academics at those colleges, players will have career opportunities in something other than football. The average NFL career is 2-1/2 years. Rice and Army grads can top that.

The NBA is completing its season in a bubble in Orlando, with players confined to their hotels between games. Only 22 teams are in Orlando for the lockdown. The Rockets organization sent about 35 people, including coaches, players and essential personnel to Orlando.

Baseball is playing its season outside a bubble. So many players are testing positive for coronavirus that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred last week threatened to end the season if teams don't do a better job of enforcing the league's health protocol. What's left is an unbalanced season. For example, the Atlanta Braves and Seattle Mariners have played 18 games, while the St. Louis Cardinals have played only five games. The ironically first-place Miami Marlins, which had 18 players test positive, have played only 10 games.

College football can't be played in a bubble. There are too many teams, with some having more than 100 players and 20 coaches. And no sport thrives on fans' excitement and marching bands like college football. Several colleges, including the University of Texas and Texas A&M, have stadiums that hold more than 100,000 fans. Even if college football could be played in a bubble, it would require isolating players from August to January, when they're supposed to be in class. I know … supposed.

This one is easy. For the health and safety of players, play the fall 2020 season in spring 2021.

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Is the experiment already over? Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images.

Now that the Rockets' season is over, it is time for Rockets GM Daryl Morey to reevaluate the roster. Besides the coaching vacancy, the Rockets need to make moves during the offseason, so they can compete for a championship.

When the Rockets got Russell Westbrook for Chris Paul and two first round draft picks last summer, it was reasonable trade. As the Rockets took a second-round exit versus the Lakers, eyebrows have risen. Westbrook struggled inside the bubble during the playoffs after missing some time because of a quad injury. He had a playoff low by averaging 18 points per game, shooting 24 percent from three, and only making 53 percent at the free throw line.

Westbrook was not as effective when James Harden was doubled. There were countless times when the Lakers left Westbrook wide open from the perimeter. In the +/- category, Westbrook made the Rocket 4.6 points worse in the playoffs. Westbrook's net rating was six points worse, and he averaged four turnovers a game. The horrifying part is the Rockets owe Westbrook $133 million over the next three seasons.

Russell Westbrook left wide open for a 3-pointer | Lakers vs Rockets youtu.be


After doing some research, Westbrook is tradable for the Rockets so it won't be a surprise if a deal happens over the offseason. Greg Swartz from Bleacher Report came up with a great trade idea for the Rockets where they would get a lot in return. If the Rockets trade Westbrook and Robert Covington to the Indiana Pacers, they could possibly get PG Malcolm Brogdon, C Myles Turner, F Doug McDermott, G/F Jeremy Lamb, and a 2021 first-round pick (lottery-protected). The Rockets would get shooting, blocks, rebounds, and another player to build around for the future.

I believe it is better to send Westbrook off than Eric Gordon because the Rockets would get more in return. If the Rockets trade Gordon and Covington, they could possibly get Gordon Hayward from the Celtics. But another injury prone player would not help the Rockets win a championship or make the Western Conference Finals.

Hopefully, Rockets GM Daryl Morey makes the right decision when it comes to evaluating trade options for the Rockets. The team needs a culture change for next season.

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