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What you need to know as UIL announces Texas high school football schedules

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University Interscholastic League (UIL) recently announced schedules for the 2020 fall football season in Texas.

"With the understanding that not all schools will be able to start at the same time, this plan allows for schools to make playing decisions at the local level, and UIL will work directly with schools that have scheduling issues not addressed in this plan to allow them flexibility to complete as many contests as possible," according to a UIL press release.

Class 5A and 6A programs will notice the most changes. Practices for 5A and 6A schools will begin September 7, and games will kick off September 14. There won't be any changes for Class 1A, 2A, 3A, and 4A. Practices will start August 3, and games a week later.

"This plan provides a delay for schools in highly populated metro areas, primarily Class 5A-6A, given the challenges with COVID-19 those communities are facing," according to the UIL statement.

UIL will impose a strict coronavirus screening policy once athletic activities resume. Players, coaches, and staff must undergo a self-screening for COVID-19 symptoms before participating in a sport or entering any UIL venue.

Kevin Hall, head coach of the Manvel High School 5A football team, knows that towns across Texas are excited for their local football team to start playing games.

"I can understand why the UIL did what they did. I am just very, very thankful that, as of right now, we are going to play football at all. Let's face it, when you go to towns all over the state of Texas, sports are everyone's common interest." Hall said.

Hall said he is enforcing UIL mandated COVID-19 precautions and will continue to put his players' safety first.

"Our priority is to make sure we are doing our best to stay safe with social distancing and wearing masks. No situation is perfect and we understand that. It is our responsibility as a coaching staff to do what we can do to help eliminate chances of kids getting sick." Hall said.

Hall added that he is aware that a surge in coronavirus among players could put the season at a sudden halt.

"I know things will possibly change through the season, but like I have told our kids through our summer program, I refused to let this virus define our season. It is not going to happen. We are stronger than that, and we are going to take what is thrown at us and come out better on the other end," Hall said.

Andres Gomez, athletic director and head football coach at 6A Northbrook High School commented on what the schedule change will mean for Northbrook's football program.

"The UIL announcement to push the start of the season back a month gives us something to look forward to. While we know that it is far from concrete because of the fluidity of our circumstances, we can at least see some light at the end of the tunnel. This only strengthens our desire to get out and compete," Gomez said.

Tim Teykl, athletic director and head football coach at 6A Alvin High School, said people should not be view UIL's announcement as a delay, but celebrate football's return.

"People are looking right past the fact that the UIL just waved the green flag. The fact that they opened it up and said we are going to slowly return to normalcy by giving back sports and giving us the ability to work with the kids. Big kudos to the UIL," Teykl said.

Teykl credited UIL for recognizing that large 5A and 6A schools need more time to prepare for their season than smaller schools.

"A lot of people are asking why UIL's 1A thru 4A schools will begin their seasons earlier than 5A and 6A. It is really quite easy when people understand it is a numbers game. Eighty-one percent of UIL participation in high school football in Texas comes from 5A and 6A schools. You have to give them consideration on how to manage a population that big," Teykl said.

In the UIL press release, executive director Dr. Charles Breithaupt commented about unpredictable circumstances relating to coronavirus but remained confident in the League's return plan.

"While understanding situations change and there will likely be interruptions that will require flexibility and patience, we are hopeful this plan allows students to participate in the education-based activities they love in a way that prioritizes safety and mitigates risk of COVID-19 spread," said Dr. Breithaupt in UIL's press release.

UIL announced that school systems may conduct corona screenings of their own, via online the internet. Northbrook is part of Spring Branch ISD and the district has issued a Health and Safety Protocol Acknowledgement that families of players must sign.

"Parents must ensure they do not send a student to participate in UIL activities if the student has COVID-19 symptoms or is lab-confirmed with COVID-19 until the conditions for re-entry are met," according to UIL guidelines.

To stay updated on UIL's COVID-19 Risk Mitigation guidelines, click on https://www.uiltexas.org/policy/covid-19/2020-2021-uil-covid-19-risk-mitigation-guidelines

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James Harden was 100-percent exactly right earlier this week when he said the Houston Rockets were "just not good enough."

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Toyota Center public address announcer Matt Thomas: "Usually when former Rockets come to town for the first time since leaving, I give them a positive introduction. It's up to the fans how to react."

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