Every-Thing Sports

Teach your kids history. It's important.

Jermaine's adult-sized kids (photo credit: Jermaine Every)

History is important. That's why we have to take it in some form all throughout grade school. We must learn our history or we're bound to repeat it. That line mainly goes for the bad stuff, but the good things in history must be learned as well. There are lessons in all of it.

Some history is more important than others. For example, crazed dictators, how they took over, abused power, and made the world a worse place is one example. Slavery and its atrocities, some of which still go on today. There are countless other examples I could rattle off here, but that's not the point, nor is it the focus of this article.

I had one of those proud dad moments last week. My son loves playing NBA 2k. Especially playing with his friends online. They often use current teams with roster updates. However on this occasion, they preferred to go with classic teams. His buddy used the 2000-01 Lakers because he said that was the most dominant team from that decade. My son went with the 1970-71 Bucks because he wanted to combat the duo of Kobe and Shaq with Oscar Robertson and Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, aka Lew Alcindor, aka Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

I asked him why he had chosen that particular Bucks team. His response was the kind of thing that makes you smile. He said Robertson was the first to average a triple double and did so without stat-padding. He also said Abdul-Jabbar is the all-time leading scorer and some say he's the G.O.A.T. Words can't express how proud I was at that moment.

I've always tried to teach my kids the history of things. When it comes to sports, it's been an uphill battle at times. I think I'm not getting through to them, and they prove me wrong. I used to think my kids would have info go through one ear and out the other when they'd like to hang with me when I'm studying sports. I'd try to teach them things by talking about what I'm reading or watching. Never did I think it would sink in. Back in the summer of 2015, the kids and the wife were in New Orleans visiting my family. They were all talking about the Saints cutting Junior Galette. My daughter asked them how would that effect the Saints cap because he had just signed a contract extension the year before. She was nine at the time.

When the Saints won their Super Bowl, my son was a ball of nerves the whole first half because they were losing. I couldn't help calm him down because I was in New Orleans watching with my grandfather because that's how we spent every major Saints game ever since I was a kid. The poor boy's nerves were so bad, they took him to the movies to get his mind off of it. He knew this was the furthest they had gotten and might never have a chance at another Super Bowl again. He needed updates on the game while at the movies and insisted on watching the end when they got home. He erupted with joy and called me. He was six at the time.

Last year, I wrote about creating lifelong memories with your kids by attending sporting events. It was centered upon the road trip my daughter and I took to WrestleMania (we watch every year if we can't take a road trip to attend). Those are memories they'll have forever. However, teaching them the history of those sports, teams, and players is another bonding experience that adds knowledge to the memories. Besides, it's really cool to hear your kids school their peers when it comes to that kind of stuff.

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